SPCH 1311

Professor Colangelo

Informative Speech Assignment #2: Keyword Outline

Description

The Keyword Outline will be your speaking notes (see EXAMPLE: Keyword Outline: Maine Coon Cats). 

A Keyword Outline allows enough notes to remember your ideas without being able to read word-for-word. 

The purpose of using a Keyword Outline as speaking notes is to promote extemporaneous speaking and avoid reading. 

 

KEYWORD OUTLINE RULES

5 words per outline symbol except when quoting.

Quotes may exceed the 5 words per outline symbol limit only with quotation marks and expert source citation.

The source citation (e.g. “According to….expert source”) is NOT part of the 5 words per outline symbol limit.

Names, titles, hyphenated words count as one word. 

 

Note Cards versus 8x11 Paper

Your speaking notes may be handwritten index cards or typed 8x11 paper.

Paper or Cards: Your speaking notes MUST reflect a Keyword Outline. 

Using a Full-Sentence Outline as speaking notes will result in a failing grade for the informative speech.

 

(Remember: You are responsible for the content in the links below)

Extemporaneous Speaking involves planning, preparing, and practicing the speech. 

Extemporaneous speakers do not memorize speeches word-for-word, nor do they read their speeches. 

They seek to achieve a conversational-style of speaking, rather than memorizing the full-sentence outline. 

I always recommend memorizing ideas, not words. 

Effective extemporaneous speakers are poised and confident. 

They establish and maintain consistent eye contact with all of the audience members. 

Effective extemporaneous speakers rarely refer to speaking notes because they know their subject well. 

They also give a polished presentation that integrates verbal and nonverbal communication skills. 

Avoid delivery errors by reading: Public Speaking Delivery Tips. 

Review the characteristics of extemporaneous speakers in the Speech Grading Criteria. 

Review the behaviors for successful and unsuccessful delivery: Self-Assessment of Nonverbal Elements of Delivery.

One of the Most Common Mistakes in Public Speaking involves poor delivery which is often a function of poor practice and/or poor speaking notes.

 

Avoid these types of delivery:

Manuscript Speaking: reading the speech word-for-word from a prepared text (includes Power Point slides)

Memorized Speaking: the speech is committed to memory word-for-word

Impromptu Speaking: an unprepared, unplanned, and unpracticed speech

 

Students must speak from a Keyword Outline (on note cards or 8x11 paper)

You will be asked for your Keyword Outline (Your Speaking Notes cards or 8x11 paper) immediately after you speak for re-grading.

Whatever notes you speak from will be counted as “your Keyword Outline”, so make sure it reflects the criteria for a Keyword Outline whether it is on 8x11 paper or note cards. The Keyword Outline Evaluation

Students will not earn a passing grade on the speech if they speak from a Full-Sentence Outline, a Working Outline, or text on Power Point slides. 

Instructions for Making a Keyword Outline

1.    Use your Full-Sentence Outline to develop your Keyword Outline

a)    INCORPORATE RECOMMENDED REVISIONS from Dr. Lyn’s feedback.

b)    Failure to make the recommended revisions from Dr. Lyn’s feedback will be recorded as “Failure to Progress” = forfeit double points.

2.    Reduce every sentence in the Full-Sentence Outline to 5 keywords, including introduction, transitions, & conclusion.

a)    Only 5 keywords allowed per outline symbol, except when quoting

i)     Leave quotes written word-for-word with quotation marks

ii)    The words “According to the EXPERT SOURCE …..” DO NOT count towards the 5 word limit.

b)    Leave visual aid notes (e.g. Power Point slide of XXXX)

c)    Leave the outline format, indentation, and outline symbols intact

d)   Leave the Reference List included in Keyword Outline

e)    Remove: Specific purpose is NOT included in Keyword Outline (since you never say it to the audience)

3.    Speaking Notes: Note Cards versus 8x11 Paper

f)     You decide if you want your Keyword Outline Speaking Notes on note cards (what size of cards, handwritten text, typed text, etc.)

g)    You decide if you want your Keyword Outline Speaking Notes on 8x11 paper.

h)   Make sure the font size is readable for you.

4.    Instructions for Keyword Outline on Note Cards

i)     One card for your introduction and one card for your conclusion

j)     One –two cards for each main point

k)    Record quotes on the back of the index cards

l)     Label or number your cards

m)  Observe criteria below for Keyword Outline speaking notes

5.    Criteria for Keyword Outline Speaking Notes

n)   Keywords ONLY (reduce every sentence in full-sentence outline to 5 words per letter or number, except when quoting and then use quotation marks and cite sources)

o)    Speaking notes must reflect content of full-sentence outline

p)    Must be in outline form (same as full-sentence outline)

q)    Must include introduction, body, and conclusion (same as full-sentence outline)

r)     Must include transitions, source citations, visual aid notes, & Reference List (same as full-sentence outline)

s)    Review your Keyword Outline with Evaluation for Keyword Outline.

6.    Practice speaking with Keyword Outline 10x alone & 10x to people.

t)     Stand and deliver speech out loud using your Keyword Outline Speaking Notes.

u)   Refer to Full-Sentence Outline as needed and make adjustments to Keyword Outline.

v)    After adjusting your notes, begin again.

w)   Complete this type of rehearsal at least ten times over a period of days.

x)    Your goal is to achieve Extemporaneous Speaking

y)    Deliver your speech to real people TEN MORE TIMES (friends/family/etc) to practice eye contact & using visual aids/speaking notes, etc.

 

Assignment Policy

1.    SAVE assignments as MSWord 6/7-compatible documents (doc, docx, rtf, odt).

a.    Only assignments SAVED AS MSWord 6/7-compatible documents (doc, docx, odt, or rtf) are accepted for grading.

b.    Other types of documents are not accepted for grading.

2.    SUBMIT assignments as attachments to ACCmail.

a.    Only assignments attached to ACCmail are accepted for grading.

b.    Assignments sent in the BODY of ACCmail are not accepted for grading.

c.    Only assignments sent with the correct five-digit course synonym in the ACCmail subject line are accepted for grading.

3.    Enter Your 5-digit Course Synonym as the ACCmailSubject” line

4.    SAVE assignment with correct assignment title.

a.    Your Last Name Inform Assign #1

b.    Your Last Name Inform Assign #2 (e.g. Colangelo Inform Assign #2)

c.    Your Last Name Inform Assign #3

5.    In addition:

a.    Please submit only one assignment per email.

b.    Please submit assignments in order (#1, #2, #3).

c.    Assignments that violate assignment policies forfeit 20%.

d.    Assignments received after midnight on the due date forfeit 20%.

 

(Remember: You are responsible for the content in the links below)

REFRESHER: Steps to develop a Full-Sentence Outline

7.    Use the Full-Sentence Outline Format to develop your outline (Use this format for “outlining” and following rules)

8.    Determine your Choosing a speech topic & Speech Ideas (Look here for topic ideas) NO HOW-TO, DEMONSTRATION, OR PERSUASIVE SPEECHES

9.    Determine your specific purpose statement (Look here for how to write a specific purpose statement: Read the final sentence!)

10.  Determine your thesis statement with information hunger (Look here for how to write a thesis statement with information hunger)

11.  Organize Main Points using one of the Informative Speech Designs (Look here for Rules for Main Points and organizing your main points)

12.  Develop your main points with supporting material.

13.  Cite Sources using Public Speaking Style in the Body of the speech outline to document information.

a.    Only THREE source-cites allowed in the Body of the speech.

i.      Three cites in Body of Speech Outline = A quality content

ii.     Two cites in Body of Speech Outline = B quality content

iii.    One cite in Body of Speech Outline = C quality content

b.    Citing Sources in the Introduction Attention-Getter or Conclusion Clincher do NOT count towards the grading requirement.

c.    Only one quote per source: Paraphrase additional quotes without the source-cite.

d.    Citing Sources in Public Speaking was learned for the Group Discussion Standard Agenda, so errors will be recorded as “Failure to Progress” = forfeit double points.

14.  Add an Introduction Attention-Getter using a recommended attention-getter technique (Look here for Recommended Attention-Getter Techniques and Sins of Introductions)

15.  Add a Conclusion Clincher using a recommended technique (Look here for Recommended Clincher Techniques and Sins of Conclusions)

16.  Add transitions to the speech outline

17.  Add visual aid notes to the speech outline

18.  Create the Reference List using MLA Style at the end of the outline

a.    The Reference List is NOT a separate document.

b.    Citing Sources in Public Speaking was learned for the Group Discussion Standard Agenda, so errors will be recorded as “Failure to Progress” = forfeit double points.

 

Grading

90-100%    "A" quality work meets the highest standards

                  Insightful understanding of the subject matter and assignment;
Complete & accurate; meticulous attention to detail in quality of analysis & writing.

80-89%      "B" quality work falls short of one or two criteria described above

Accurate understanding of the subject matter and assignment;
Minor deficiency in completeness, accuracy, or quality of analysis or writing.

70-79%      "C" quality work falls short of three or four criteria described above

                  Superficial understanding of the subject matter or assignment;
Obvious deficiency in completeness, accuracy, or quality of analysis or writing.

60-69%      "D" quality work falls short of five or six criteria described above

                  Lack of understanding of the subject matter or assignment;
Multiple deficiencies in completeness, accuracy, or quality of analysis or writing.