David M. Lauderback, Ph.D.

Professor of History


Country Report Outline Guidelines
US History II
Synchronous

http://www.austincc.edu/dlauderb
 

The Country Report Outline

The purpose of the Outline is to give students an opportunity to organize their research in a useful manner and to provide the blueprint for the Final Draft.  The Outline must conform to the Format and Documentation Requirements specified below.  Students must submit an Outline by the deadline listed in the Course Schedule.

Please see the Course Schedule for the dates by which you must:  submit your Country Page, complete your Annotated Bibliography, complete your Outline, and turn in your Final Draft.

Submitting an Outline

Students are expected to accomplish five (5) tasks in the Final Draft:

To assist  in developing the Final Draft, students will be required to complete an Outline of their proposed Country Report.  A typical Country Report would be organized as follows.

Title: Subtitle
By [Your Name]

I. Introduction

Here students will rely on the Country Page to frame the research paper.  The introduction will explain where the country is located and the relative significance of the country to regional and world politics.  Students will revise the Country Page as necessary to explain why the country does or does not pose a security threat to the United States.  Then, conclude with a dynamic thesis statement that explains how your Conflict Resolution Plan will benefit the national security of the United States.
II. Threat Assessment
A. Historical Context
Purpose:  Here students will use the secondary sources from the Annotated Bibliography to place their research in social political, economic, security, and historical context.  The purpose of this paragraph is to give the reader a sense of what is happening in the country in question by summarizing current assessments.
Directions:  Focus on your Country Page and explain how the sources from Annotated Bibliography treat the same themes.  You should be able to combine your discussion of the secondary sources in the Annotated Bibliography to write the historical context.

[Outline format]

1. Topic sentence

[Explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why.' Begin your paragraph with a dynamic topic sentence that tells the reader who did what in the paragraph and why it matters. When you tell your reader what you are going to talk about, you describe. When you explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why' it matters, now you analyze. So be sure to start your paragraph with a topic sentence that identifies the key historical actor or actors, explains what they did, and why.  So be sure to tell the reader: 'who' did 'what' and 'why.']

2. Sentence with quote from secondary source with end note.
3. Sentence with quote from secondary source with end note.
4. Sentence with quote from secondary source with end note.
5. Sentence with quote from secondary source with end note.
6. Sentence with quote from secondary source with end note.
7. Concluding thought
[Remember, explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why.']
Use at least five (5) quotes from at least four (4) different secondary sources in points 2-6 above.  You may include more quotes and add the number of points you intend to make in your Final Draft.  See the Documentation requirements below for the proper format for citing your sources.
B. Analysis
In the next several paragraphs, students will examine the themes discussed in the introduction by offering evidence drawn from the primary sources.  These paragraphs give the student a chance to show the reader the evidence they have collected and how that evidence supports their contention in the thesis statement.

Directions:  Collect selected quotes from the primary sources that illustrate the main point of the paragraph and which support the topics sentence.  Organize your evidence as follows:

[Outline format]

1. Topic sentence

[Explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why.' Begin your paragraph with a dynamic topic sentence that tells the reader who did what in the paragraph and why it matters. When you tell your reader what you are going to talk about, you describe. When you explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why' it matters, now you analyze. So be sure to start your paragraph with a topic sentence that identifies the key historical actor or actors, explains what they did, and why.  So be sure to tell the reader: 'who' did 'what' and 'why.']

2. Quote from primary source with end note.
3. Quote from primary source with end note.
4. Quote from primary source with end note.
5. Quote from primary source with end note.
6. Quote from primary source with end note.
7. Concluding thought
[Remember, explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why.']
Use at least five (5) quotes from at least four (4) different primary sources in points 2-6 above.  You may include more quotes and add the number of points you intend to make in your Final Draft.  See the Documentation requirements below for the proper format for citing your sources.
C. Analysis
Directions:  Collect selected quotes from the primary sources that illustrate the main point of the paragraph and which support the topics sentence.  Organize your evidence as follows:

[Outline format]

1. Topic sentence

[Explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why.' Begin your paragraph with a dynamic topic sentence that tells the reader who did what in the paragraph and why it matters. When you tell your reader what you are going to talk about, you describe. When you explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why' it matters, now you analyze. So be sure to start your paragraph with a topic sentence that identifies the key historical actor or actors, explains what they did, and why.  So be sure to tell the reader: 'who' did 'what' and 'why.']

2. Quote from primary source with end note.
3. Quote from primary source with end note.
4. Quote from primary source with end note.
5. Quote from primary source with end note.
6. Quote from primary source with end note.
7. Concluding thought
[Remember, explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why.']
Use at least five (5) quotes from at least four (4) different primary sources in points 2-6 above.  You may include more quotes and add the number of points you intend to make in your Final Draft.  See the Documentation requirements below for the proper format for citing your sources.


D. Analysis

Directions:  Collect selected quotes from the primary sources that illustrate the main point of the paragraph and which support the topics sentence.  Organize your evidence as follows:

[Outline format]

1. Topic sentence

[Explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why.' Begin your paragraph with a dynamic topic sentence that tells the reader who did what in the paragraph and why it matters. When you tell your reader what you are going to talk about, you describe. When you explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why' it matters, now you analyze. So be sure to start your paragraph with a topic sentence that identifies the key historical actor or actors, explains what they did, and why.  So be sure to tell the reader: 'who' did 'what' and 'why.']

2. Quote from primary source with end note.
3. Quote from primary source with end note.
4. Quote from primary source with end note.
5. Quote from primary source with end note.
6. Quote from primary source with end note.
7. Concluding thought
[Remember, explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why.']
Use at least five (5) quotes from at least four (4) different primary sources in points 2-6 above.  You may include more quotes and add the number of points you intend to make in your Final Draft.  See the Documentation requirements below for the proper format for citing your sources.
E. Analysis
Directions:  Collect selected quotes from the primary sources that illustrate the main point of the paragraph and which support the topics sentence.  Organize your evidence as follows:

[Outline format]

1. Topic sentence

[Explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why.' Begin your paragraph with a dynamic topic sentence that tells the reader who did what in the paragraph and why it matters. When you tell your reader what you are going to talk about, you describe. When you explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why' it matters, now you analyze. So be sure to start your paragraph with a topic sentence that identifies the key historical actor or actors, explains what they did, and why.  So be sure to tell the reader: 'who' did 'what' and 'why.']

2. Quote from primary source with end note.
3. Quote from primary source with end note.
4. Quote from primary source with end note.
5. Quote from primary source with end note.
6. Quote from primary source with end note.
7. Concluding thought
[Remember, explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why.']
Use at least five (5) quotes from at least four (4) different primary sources in points 2-6 above.  You may include more quotes and add the number of points you intend to make in your Final Draft.  See the Documentation requirements below for the proper format for citing your sources.
F. Analysis
Directions:  Collect selected quotes from the primary sources that illustrate the main point of the paragraph and which support the topics sentence.  Organize your evidence as follows:

[Outline format]

1. Topic sentence

[Explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why.' Begin your paragraph with a dynamic topic sentence that tells the reader who did what in the paragraph and why it matters. When you tell your reader what you are going to talk about, you describe. When you explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why' it matters, now you analyze. So be sure to start your paragraph with a topic sentence that identifies the key historical actor or actors, explains what they did, and why.  So be sure to tell the reader: 'who' did 'what' and 'why.']

2. Quote from primary source with end note.
3. Quote from primary source with end note.
4. Quote from primary source with end note.
5. Quote from primary source with end note.
6. Quote from primary source with end note.
7. Concluding thought
[Remember, explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why.']
Use at least five (5) quotes from at least four (4) different primary sources in points 2-6 above.  You may include more quotes and add the number of points you intend to make in your Final Draft.  See the Documentation requirements below for the proper format for citing your sources.
G. Analysis
Directions:  Collect selected quotes from the primary sources that illustrate the main point of the paragraph and which support the topics sentence.  Organize your evidence as follows:

[Outline format]

1. Topic sentence

[Explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why.' Begin your paragraph with a dynamic topic sentence that tells the reader who did what in the paragraph and why it matters. When you tell your reader what you are going to talk about, you describe. When you explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why' it matters, now you analyze. So be sure to start your paragraph with a topic sentence that identifies the key historical actor or actors, explains what they did, and why.  So be sure to tell the reader: 'who' did 'what' and 'why.']

2. Quote from primary source with end note.
3. Quote from primary source with end note.
4. Quote from primary source with end note.
5. Quote from primary source with end note.
6. Quote from primary source with end note.
7. Concluding thought
[Remember, explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why.']
Use at least five (5) quotes from at least four (4) different primary sources in points 2-6 above.  You may include more quotes and add the number of points you intend to make in your Final Draft.  See the Documentation requirements below for the proper format for citing your sources.
H. Threat Assessment
This is most important paragraph in the first part of your Final Draft.  Here, you will evaluate your evidence and compare that to the analysis provided by the secondary sources.  Does your research support, contradict, and/or modify the existing literature?  Your research might do some of all three.  Show how and why with specific examples from the secondary and primary sources.

[Outline format]

1. Topic sentence
[Remember, explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why.']
 2. Restate topic sentence to II. A.
3. Restate topic sentence to II. B.
4. Restate topic sentence to II. C.
5. Restate topic sentence to II. D.
6. Restate topic sentence to II. E.
7. Restate topic sentence to II. F.
8. Restate topic sentence to II. G.
7. Concluding thought
[Remember, explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why.']


III. National Security Action Plan  Conflict Resolution Plan

NOTE:  Parts B. Political, C. Economic, & D. Security below are suggested categories.  You may follow the rubric below or not.  You might decide to emphasize only economic issues and offer three paragraphs on economic options for your Conflict Resolution Plan.  Or some combination of your own.  Totally up to you.
 

A. Conflict Resolution Rationale

In this paragraph explain how the United States needs to take action.  You need to identify the areas that require critical attention and state why the point deserves focus.

[Outline format]
1. Topic sentence
[Remember, explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why.']
 2. Target concern
3. Rationale
4. Target concern
5. Rationale
6. Target concern
7. Concluding thought
[Remember, explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why.']
Use at least five (5) quotes from at least four (4) different primary sources in points 2-6 above.  You may include more quotes and add the number of points you intend to make in your Final Draft.  See the Documentation requirements below for the proper format for citing your sources.
 
B. Economic Resolution Plan

In this paragraph, identify the primary economic considerations for your action plan and how the steps you itemize will assist in promoting security

[Outline format]
1. Topic sentence

[Explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why.' Begin your paragraph with a dynamic topic sentence that tells the reader who did what in the paragraph and why it matters. When you tell your reader what you are going to talk about, you describe. When you explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why' it matters, now you analyze. So be sure to start your paragraph with a topic sentence that identifies the key historical actor or actors, explains what they did, and why.  So be sure to tell the reader: 'who' did 'what' and 'why.']

2. Quote from primary source with end note.
3. Quote from primary source with end note.
4. Quote from primary source with end note.
5. Quote from primary source with end note.
6. Quote from primary source with end note.
7. Concluding thought
[Remember, explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why.']
Use at least five (5) quotes from at least four (4) different primary sources in points 2-6 above.  You may include more quotes and add the number of points you intend to make in your Final Draft.  See the Documentation requirements below for the proper format for citing your sources.
 

C. Political Resolution Plan

In this paragraph, identify the primary political considerations for your action plan and how the steps you itemize will assist in promoting security

[Outline format]
1. Topic sentence

[Explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why.' Begin your paragraph with a dynamic topic sentence that tells the reader who did what in the paragraph and why it matters. When you tell your reader what you are going to talk about, you describe. When you explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why' it matters, now you analyze. So be sure to start your paragraph with a topic sentence that identifies the key historical actor or actors, explains what they did, and why.  So be sure to tell the reader: 'who' did 'what' and 'why.']

2. Quote from primary source with end note.
3. Quote from primary source with end note.
4. Quote from primary source with end note.
5. Quote from primary source with end note.
6. Quote from primary source with end note.
7. Concluding thought
[Remember, explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why.']
Use at least five (5) quotes from at least four (4) different primary sources in points 2-6 above.  You may include more quotes and add the number of points you intend to make in your Final Draft.  See the Documentation requirements below for the proper format for citing your sources.

D. Security Resolution Plan

In this paragraph, identify the primary security considerations for your action plan and how the steps you itemize will assist in promoting security

[Outline format]
1. Topic sentence

[Explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why.' Begin your paragraph with a dynamic topic sentence that tells the reader who did what in the paragraph and why it matters. When you tell your reader what you are going to talk about, you describe. When you explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why' it matters, now you analyze. So be sure to start your paragraph with a topic sentence that identifies the key historical actor or actors, explains what they did, and why.  So be sure to tell the reader: 'who' did 'what' and 'why.']

2. Quote from primary source with end note.
3. Quote from primary source with end note.
4. Quote from primary source with end note.
5. Quote from primary source with end note.
6. Quote from primary source with end note.
7. Concluding thought
[Remember, explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why.']
Use at least five (5) quotes from at least four (4) different primary sources in points 2-6 above.  You may include more quotes and add the number of points you intend to make in your Final Draft.  See the Documentation requirements below for the proper format for citing your sources.
IV. Conclusion
In this paragraph, you need to re-state your thesis, summarize your main findings, and conclude with the artionale for your action plan.

Format Requirements

ALL ASSIGNMENTS -- COUNTRY PAGE, ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY, OUTLINE, AND FINAL DRAFT -- MUST CONFORM TO THE FORMAT SPECIFICATIONS BELOW.  ANY COUNTRY PAGE, ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY, OUTLINE, OR FINAL DRAFT THAT DOES NOT CONFORM TO THE FORMAT SPECIFICATIONS BELOW WILL LOSE POINTS

NOTE: Documents that fail to conform to three or more of the format and document requirements below will NOT BE ACCEPTED.

The format requirements for the completed Country Page, Annotated Bibliography, Outline and Final Draft are:

Please:

DO NOT BOLDFACE; or
DO NOT ITALICIZE; or
DO    NOT         JUSTIFY

your text.

The above particulars are designed to ensure that all students complete works of similar length.

Please:

Do NOT use folders or other such binders; and
You do NOT need a cover sheet.

Documentation

ALL ASSIGNMENTS -- COUNTRY PAGE, ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY, OUTLINE, AND FINAL DRAFT -- MUST CONFORM TO THE DOCUMENTATION SPECIFICATIONS BELOW.  ANY COUNTRY PAGE, ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY, OUTLINE, OR FINAL DRAFT THAT DOES NOT CONFORM TO THE DOCUMENTATION SPECIFICATIONS BELOW WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.

The documentation requirements for the completed Country Page, Annotated Bibliography, Outline, and Final Draft are:

To ensure that you give credit where credit is due, please refer to the source from which you extracted information with an endnote and a bibliography.  Start with the The Chicago Manual of Style Online. Please use end notes to document your sources using the appropriate formatting (see above).  For the correct style, you can also see Kate L. Turabian, A Manual for Writers of Term Papers, Theses, and Dissertations, 6th ed. (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1996). The ACC Library has a link to Turabian, but the guide is currently under renovation and has several inaccuracies. Use the The Chicago Manual of Style Onlineg Both the Chicago Manual of Style and the Turabian guides can be found at the ACC Library

And here is a new link specifically for Government Documents.  The ACC Library link to Turabian has a method at the very bottom of the page that gives a formula for citing government sources.  The new Government Documents link has more specific examples.

Please do NOT use reference style where you put the author's name and page number at the end of the sentence. (Lauderback 2013, 1) Instead, be sure to insert an endnote in your text to tell your reader you have details that come from a source that is not you. Go to Microsoft Word Help and enter 'endnote' for how to insert notes. See the The Chicago Manual of Style Online for:

The ACC Librarians have put together a remarkable page with all kinds of details and examples for you to follow. And, a link for asking questions! Check out Turabian. Please use the appropriate formatting -- including margins, font size and type, and spacing (see above).

Include a Bibliography on a separate page (with no page number), at the end of your Topic Page,Outline and Final Draft.  Here you provide a complete citation for each work cited. A bibliography is NOT the same as a Works Cited. And, a bibliography is NOT the same as the endnotes. And while a bibliography includes most of the same information as the notes, there are important differences, e.g., the order of the author's names, the use of commas, periods, parentheses, and page numbers. Please use the appropriate formatting -- including margins, font size and type, and spacing (see above). 

And, please, do NOT ask if you can use MLA.  Use Turabian.

Grading Policy

The Outline will be graded "ACCEPTED" or "NOT ACCEPTED."  Recognize that an Outline rife with misspellings and grammatical errors will NOT be considered acceptable.  Any Outline that does NOT conform to the Format and Documentation specifications above will NOT be accepted.  If you submit your Outline before the deadline date in the Course Schedule and it is graded "NOT ACCEPTED" you may revise it and resubmit it prior to the deadline date.  Any Outline that is NOT submitted by the deadline listed in the Course Schedule will NOT be accepted.

Deadlines

STUDENTS WHO DO NOT SUBMIT AN OUTLINE BY THE DEADLINE LISTED IN THE COURSE SCHEDULE WILL NOT BE PERMITTED TO SUBMIT A FINAL DRAFT;

The Country Report has several components.   Please see the Course Schedule for the dates by which you must:  submit your Country Page, complete your Annotated Bibliography, complete your Outline, and turn in your Final Draft.

David Marcus Lauderback, 2022, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED