David M. Lauderback, Ph.D.
Professor of History

ORAL HISTORY REPORT
OUTLINE GUIDELINES
U.S. HISTORY II ONLine
A-LEVEL OBJECTIVE

http://www.austincc.edu/dlauderb

For the grade of B
In addition to the two course contacts, the student must take all 14 InQuizitive assignments, the 14 Chapter Quizzes, the 5 Unit Exams,, and:
  • earn a total course average of 80% on the 14 InQuizitive assignments, the 14 Chapter Quizzes, the 5 Unit Exams, and one (1) completed Oral History Report

Failure to take all 14 InQuizitive assignments, the 14 Chapter Quizzes, the 5 Unit Exams, will result in a F in the course.

NOTE
: The highest grade you can earn in the course without a completed Oral History Report is a C.

To complete the B-Level objective, see the Oral History Report page for details on how to:

a.) submit the Respondent for your oral history report;
b.) submit the completed Recorded Interview and Outline (25 points) for your oral history report; and
c.) turn in the completed Final Draft of the oral history report (25 points).
NOTE:  You must complete all parts of a oral history report by the deadlines listed in the Course Schedule for the assignment to factor in to your final average and your final grade. You may not earn "partial credit." The points on the outlines and final drafts are not extra credit.

Instead, like the quizzes and exams, the points on oral history report are calculated in the total course average.

See your Course Schedule for the dates by which you must submit: a Respondent, the Recorded Interview and the Outline, and the Final Draft.

REMINDER:
  • Failure to take all 14 InQuizitive assignments, the 14 Chapter Quizzes, the 5 Unit Exams, will result in a F in the course.
  • The highest grade you can earn in the course without a completed  Oral History Report is a C.

For the grade of A
In addition to the two course contacts, the student must complete all 14 InQuizitive assignments, the 14 Chapter Quizzes, the 5 Unit Exams,, and:
  • make a total course average of 90% on 14 InQuizitive assignments, the 14 Chapter Quizzes, the 5 Unit Exams, and one completed A-Level Objective: 
    the Oral History Report.
Failure to take all 14 InQuizitive assignments, the 14 Chapter Quizzes, the 5 Unit Exams, will result in a F in the course.

NOTE: The highest grade you can earn in the course without a completed Oral History Report is a C. 

To complete the A-Level objective see the Oral History Report page for details on how to:
a.) submit the Respondent for your oral history report;
b.) submit the completed Recorded Interview and Outline (25 points) for your oral history report; and
c.) turn in the completed Final Draft of the oral history report (25 points).
NOTE:  You must complete all parts of a oral history report by the deadlines listed in the Course Schedule for the assignment to factor in to your final average and your final grade. You may not earn "partial credit." The points on the outlines and final drafts are not extra credit.

Instead, like the quizzes and exams, the points on oral history report are calculated in the total course average.

See your Course Schedule for the dates by which you must submit: a Respondent, the Recorded Interview and the Outline, and the Final Draft.

In addition to the two course contacts, the student must complete all 14 InQuizitive assignments, the 14 Chapter Quizzes, the 5 Unit Exams,, and:

  •  earn a total course average of 80% (20 out of 25 questions) on the 14 InQuizitive assignments, the 14 Chapter Quizzes, the 5 Unit Exams, and a completed Oral History Report for a B;
OR
  • earn a total course average of 90% (22.5 out of 25) on the 14 InQuizitive assignments, the 14 Chapter Quizzes, the 5 Unit Exams,, and a completed Oral History Report for an A.

REMINDER:

  • Failure to take all 14 InQuizitive assignments, the 14 Chapter Quizzes, the 5 Unit Exams, will result in a F in the course.
  • The highest grade you can earn in the course without a completed Oral History Report is a C.
See your Course Schedule for the dates by which you must submit: a Respondent, the Recorded Interview and the Outline, and the Final Draft. 

Outline Requirements

Students who plan to complete the Final Draft of the Oral History Report MUST complete an Outline. The Outline MUST be produced according to the directions below. There are specific requirements for each part of the Final Draft.  Students MUST highlight the key information to be contained in the Final Draft using the template below. Additionally, students MUST follow the specific format guidelines listed below. The Outline will assist you in developing the Final Draft. Students who submit the Outline before the deadline listed in the Final Draft will be permitted to revise their Outline as necessary.

Turning in the Recorded Interview

Students will be expected to turn in their Recorded Interview with their Outline. You must turn in the recording either on tape, or submit the recording on a disc/CD or via e-mail as a file that can played on Windows Media Player or through a link to some supporting software or website like Audacity, Google, iTunes, and so on. Students and are strongly encouraged to make sure that the instructor can retrieve any and all electronic files prior to any and all deadlines. It is the students responsibility -- and not the instructors -- to ensure the accurate and timely submission of all course materials. Do it early! And give me a call during my electronic office hours if you have any questions about how to submit the interview.:)

Preparing the Outline

The Outline will follow the format below.  Copy and paste the Outline format to a Word document. Keep the Outline format with all the Roman numerals I., II., III., and capital letters A. - E., and numbers 1-7.  Insert your sentences and quotes from the Respondent and the three secondary sources, update the format, insert all 25 endnotes, and add a bibliography:

"Title: Subtitle
By [Your Name]
I. Introduction

Use the Introduction to: introduce your subject, provide some background, and offer a dynamic thesis.

[NOTE: In each and every sentence of the outline and final draft be sure to: 

Explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why.' Begin your paragraph with a dynamic topic sentence that tells the reader who did what in the paragraph and why it matters. When you tell your reader what you are going to talk about, you describe. When you explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why' it matters, now you analyze. So be sure to start your paragraph with a topic sentence that identifies the key historical actor or actors, explains what they did, and why.  So be sure to tell the reader: 'who' did 'what' and 'why.']

1. Topic sentence

Start with a topic sentence that sets the stage, that introduces the main historical actors in the oral history report and explains why the reader should care about your paper. Be sure to explain who did what and why.
[Remember, explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why.']

2. Transition Sentence
[Remember, explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why.']
3. 1st Main Theme -- explain one of the two main themes of the report
[Remember, explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why.']
4. 2nd Main Theme -- explain one of the two main themes of the report
[Remember, explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why.']
5. Transition Sentence
[Remember, explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why.']

6. Thesis

State your thesis.  In one sentence, tell me the most important lesson you learned from the interview.  Concentrate on the people and explain who did what and -- most important -- why.
[Remember, explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why.']

Be sure to give the appropriate citation for the interviewee.  See Documentation below for the guidelines for academic citation of your respondent and other sources.

II. Life History and Analysis
A. Biographical Summary

1. Topic sentence

[Explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why.' Begin your paragraph with a dynamic topic sentence that tells the reader who did what in the paragraph and why it matters. When you tell your reader what you are going to talk about, you describe. When you explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why' it matters, now you analyze. So be sure to start your paragraph with a topic sentence that identifies the key historical actor or actors, explains what they did, and why.  So be sure to tell the reader: 'who' did 'what' and 'why.']

Use quotes from the respondent to highlight key biographical data, e.g., birthplace, childhood, hometown, and education; marital status, children, that you will focus on in the Final Draft.

2. Quote from respondent with end note.
3. Quote from respondent with end note.
4. Quote from respondent with end note.
5. Quote from respondent with end note.
6. Quote from respondent with end note.
7. Concluding thought.
[Remember, explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why.']

Be sure to give the appropriate citation for the interviewee.  See Documentation below for the guidelines for academic citation of your respondent and other sources.

B. Experiences

1. Topic sentence

[Explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why.' Begin your paragraph with a dynamic topic sentence that tells the reader who did what in the paragraph and why it matters. When you tell your reader what you are going to talk about, you describe. When you explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why' it matters, now you analyze. So be sure to start your paragraph with a topic sentence that identifies the key historical actor or actors, explains what they did, and why.  So be sure to tell the reader: 'who' did 'what' and 'why.']

Use quotes from the interview that highlight the key experiences that you will focus on in the Final Draft.

2. Quote from respondent with end note.
3. Quote from respondent with end note.
4. Quote from respondent with end note.
5. Quote from respondent with end note.
6. Quote from respondent with end note.
7. Concluding thought.
[Remember, explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why.']

Be sure to give the appropriate citation for the interviewee.  See Documentation below for the guidelines for academic citation of your respondent.

C. Comparison

1. Topic sentence

[Explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why.' Begin your paragraph with a dynamic topic sentence that tells the reader who did what in the paragraph and why it matters. When you tell your reader what you are going to talk about, you describe. When you explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why' it matters, now you analyze. So be sure to start your paragraph with a topic sentence that identifies the key historical actor or actors, explains what they did, and why.  So be sure to tell the reader: 'who' did 'what' and 'why.']

Now, explain whether or not the three secondary sources you use in the Comparison support the  respondent's experiences in the Final Draft.

Use quotes from the secondary sources that highlight the key experiences that you will focus on in the Final Draft.

Your textbook -- Give Me Liberty! -- may be used as one of your three secondary sources. Do not use Wikipedia, encyclopedias, History.com or other general information websites. Go to the ACC Library to look up scholarly sources. Also you can ask one of the on-call librarians for assistance.

2. Quote from secondary source with end note.
3.
Quote from secondary source with end note.
4.
Quote from secondary source with end note.
5.
Quote from secondary source with end note.
6.
Quote from secondary source with end note.
7. Concluding thought.

[Remember, explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why.']

Be sure to give the appropriate citation for the interviewee.  See Documentation below for the guidelines for academic citation of your respondent and other sources.

D. Legacy

1. Topic sentence

[Explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why.' Begin your paragraph with a dynamic topic sentence that tells the reader who did what in the paragraph and why it matters. When you tell your reader what you are going to talk about, you describe. When you explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why' it matters, now you analyze. So be sure to start your paragraph with a topic sentence that identifies the key historical actor or actors, explains what they did, and why.  So be sure to tell the reader: 'who' did 'what' and 'why.']

Focus on the impact of immigration on your respondent's life. It may be rather dramatic highlighting their own experience as immigrants. It may be very pointed, as you detail their views on immigration. Or you may concentrate on themes you develop in your paper. Use quotes from your interview to illustrate the points that you will focus on in the Final Draft.

2. Quote from respondent with end note.
3. Quote from respondent with end note.
4. Quote from respondent with end note.
5. Quote from respondent with end note.
6. Quote from respondent with end note.
7. Concluding thought.
[Remember, explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why.']

Be sure to give the appropriate citation for the interviewee.  See Documentation below for the guidelines for academic citation of your respondent and other sources.

E. Reaction

1. Topic sentence

State your reaction.  In one sentence, tell me your reaction to the interview.

[Explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why.' Begin your paragraph with a dynamic topic sentence that tells the reader who did what in the paragraph and why it matters. When you tell your reader what you are going to talk about, you describe. When you explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why' it matters, now you analyze. So be sure to start your paragraph with a topic sentence that identifies the key historical actor or actors, explains what they did, and why.  So be sure to tell the reader: 'who' did 'what' and 'why.']

List your additional reactions to the interview:  what did you learn?  Agreements?  Disagreements?  Biases? Use quotes from primary and or secondary sources to illustrate the points that you will focus on in the Final Draft. .

2. Include quote from primary or secondary source with end note.
3. Include quote from primary or secondary source with end note.
4. Include quote from primary or secondary source with end note.
5. Include quote from primary or secondary source with end note.
6. Include quote from primary or secondary source with end note.
7. Concluding thought.
[Remember, explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why.']

Be sure to give the appropriate citation for the interviewee.  See Documentation below for the guidelines for academic citation of your respondent and other sources.

III. Summary
In this paragraph you must summarize your paper.  Briefly restate your purpose, summarize your main points, and offer some final thoughts.

[Outline format]

1. Topic sentence.

[Explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why.' Begin your paragraph with a dynamic topic sentence that tells the reader who did what in the paragraph and why it matters. When you tell your reader what you are going to talk about, you describe. When you explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why' it matters, now you analyze. So be sure to start your paragraph with a topic sentence that identifies the key historical actor or actors, explains what they did, and why.  So be sure to tell the reader: 'who' did 'what' and 'why.']

2. Restate topic sentence to II. A.

[Remember, explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why.']
3. Restate topic sentence to II. B.

[Remember, explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why.']
4. Restate topic sentence to II. C.
[Remember, explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why.']
5. Restate topic sentence to II. D.
[Remember, explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why.']
6. Restate topic sentence to II. E.
7. Concluding thought.
[Remember, explain 'who' did 'what' and 'why.']
The Outline MUST also conform to the format requirements of the Final DraftStudents will produce the Outline following the format guidelines below.

Format Requirements

ALL ASSIGNMENTS -- OUTLINE AND FINAL DRAFT -- MUST CONFORM TO THE FORMAT SPECIFICATIONS BELOW.  ANY OUTLINE OR FINAL DRAFT THAT DOES NOT CONFORM TO THE FORMAT SPECIFICATIONS BELOW will lose Points:

The format requirements for the completed Outline and Final Draft are:

Please:

DO NOT BOLDFACE; or
DO NOT ITALICIZE; or
DO    NOT         JUSTIFY

your text.

The above particulars are designed to ensure that all students complete works of similar length.

Please:

Do NOT use folders or other such binders; and
You do NOT need a cover sheet.

Documentation

ALL ASSIGNMENTS -- OUTLINE OR FINAL DRAFT -- MUST CONFORM TO THE DOCUMENTATION SPECIFICATIONS BELOW.  ANY OUTLINE OR FINAL DRAFT THAT DOES NOT CONFORM TO THE DOCUMENTATION SPECIFICATIONS BELOW WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED.

The documentation requirements for the completed Outline and Final Draft are:

To ensure that you give credit where credit is due, please refer to the source from which you extracted information with an endnote and a bibliography using the appropriate formatting (see above).  For the correct style, start with Kate L. Turabian, A Manual for Writers of Term Papers, Theses, and Dissertations, 6th ed. (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1996). The ACC Library has a an excellent link to Turabian. You can also use the The Chicago Manual of Style Online. Both the Chicago Manual of Style and the Turabian guides can be found at the ACC Library

.......................................................................................................

NOTE: How to cite an Interview. 

If you have a recording of the interview, then be sure to include the timestamp, the time on the recording where the quote begins and ends.

Note Entry: [with timestamp]

First name Last name, Tape recording, Date, Location, 01:34-01:45.

When you have the interview in consecutive notes with a different timestamp, then do: 

Ibid., 00:15-00:23.

If you did the interview via email or text or chat or through the mail, then you will not have a time stamp.

Note Entry: [no timestamp]

First name Last name, Tape recording, Date, Location.

When you have the interview with no timestamp in consecutive notes, then do:

Ibid.

Biblio entry:

Last name, First name. Tape recording. Date. Location.

A few things.

First, if you recorded the interview with a phone, or Skype, or chat, or fb, then change Tape recording to:

Phone recording

Skype recording

personal fb conversation

And so on.

Next, punctuate the interview in the notes and the biblio. like any other note or biblio. citation, i.e., commas to separate elements in the notes; periods to separate elements in the bibliography.

Finally, use a first-line indent in the notes and a hanging indent in the bibliography.
.......................................................................................................

Please do NOT use reference style where you put the author's name and page number at the end of the sentence. (Lauderback 2013, 1) Instead, be sure to insert an endnote in your text to tell your reader you have details that come from a source that is not you. Go to Microsoft Word Help and enter 'endnote' for how to insert notes. See the ACC Turabian link for:

The ACC Librarians have put together a remarkable page with all kinds of details and examples for you to follow. And, a link for asking questions! Check out Turabian. Please use the appropriate formatting -- including margins, font size and type, and spacing (see above).

Include a Bibliography on a separate page (with no page number), at the end of your Outline and Final Draft.  Here you provide a complete citation for each work cited. A bibliography is NOT the same as a Works Cited. And, a bibliography is NOT the same as the endnotes. And while a bibliography includes most of the same information as the notes, there are important differences, e.g., the order of the author's names, the use of commas, periods, parentheses, and page numbers. Please use the appropriate formatting -- including margins, font size and type, and spacing (see above). 

And, please, do NOT ask if you can use MLA.  Use Turabian. Thank you!

Grading Policy

The Outline (25 Points)

Your grade on the outline will be based on how well you:

Recognize that an Outline rife with misspellings and format, documentation, and grammatical errors will not be considered acceptable. If you submit your  Outline before the deadline date in the Course Schedule and it is graded "NOT ACCEPTED" you may revise it and resubmit it prior to the deadline date. Outlines submitted more than one day after the deadline listed in the Course Schedule will NOT be accepted.

Deadlines

ONLY OUTLINES SUBMITTED BY 11:59 PM ON THE DEADLINE LISTED IN THE COURSE SCHEDULE CAN RECEIVE FULL CREDIT;

and

ANY OUTLINE THAT IS NOT SUBMITTED BY 11:59 PM ON THE DEADLINE LISTED IN THE COURSE SCHEDULE WILL RECEIVE A MAXIMUM OF 70% CREDIT;

and

ANY OUTLINE THAT IS SUBMITTED MORE THAN ONE DAY AFTER THE THE DEADLINE LISTED IN THE COURSE SCHEDULE WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED;

and

STUDENTS WHO DO NOT TURN IN AN OUTLINE  WILL NOT BE PERMITTED TO SUBMIT A FINAL DRAFT.

and

STUDENTS WHO TURN IN AN  OUTLINE THAT IS "NOT ACCEPTED" WILL NOT BE PERMITTED TO SUBMIT A FINAL DRAFT.

Students may submit the Outline via e-mail as a Word or PDF attachment NO LATER THAN 11:59 PM on the deadline listed in the Course Schedule.

See your Course Schedule for the dates by which you must:  select a Respondent, turn in a preliminary Outline, and turn in the Recorded Interview, and submit the Final Draft.

David Marcus Lauderback, 2024 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED