Helping Students Succeed:

The Austin Community College Developmental Education Plan

 

Austin Community College submits the following Developmental Education plan to the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board for approval. This plan is structured according to the guidelines set forth in the TASP Policy Manual, August 1999.

INTRODUCTION

Austin Community College adheres to the policies established by the Texas Legislature regarding the Texas Academic Skills Program. Unless otherwise exempt, each undergraduate student who enters a public institution of higher education must take the reading, writing, and mathematics skills assessment prior to enrolling in college level coursework. For initial testing purposes, ACC uses the COMPASS Test, an alternative test approved by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

The following ACC Developmental Plan is divided into two major sections. Part I describes the path that ACC students must follow to meet TASP requirements, student exemptions and methods to demonstrate successful completion of TASP requirements.

Part II describes the developmental plan ACC has adopted to insure that students develop the skills necessary to succeed in college level courses and to move as quickly as possible through the developmental sequence of coursework. Specifically, it explains the developmental objectives, the instructional strategies and outcomes measures ACC uses to ensure accountability and program effectiveness.

PART I. The TASP Plan - The TASP Plan describes acceptable TASP pass scores, provides guidance on course placement on the basis of cognitive test results, describes TASP requirements and recommendations for implementing the new TASP rules, and alternatives for students who are unsuccessful in passing the TASP test.

Fulfilling TASP Requirements

Students may fulfill TASP requirements by passing the TASP exam or TASP alternative test on the first attempt, passing a college level course in the area of identified deficiency with a grade of B or better or, completing the developmental sequence and passing a re-take of the TASP exam as outlined in this Plan.

Passing the TASP Test

A student can demonstrate successful completion of the TASP requirement by achieving an acceptable score on the reading, writing and mathematics sections of the exam.

TASP Scores Used At Austin Community College

Upon entering ACC, a student must present TASP Test scores or proof of exemption from TASP requirements. The COMPASS Test by ACT is available at ACC Testing Centers as a TASP alternative test for students who are not exempt or who have not taken the TASP Test. Performance standards for reaching college-level in reading, writing, and math will be the performance standards set by the THECB for the COMPASS Test:

Reading Skills 81 or above

Algebra 39 or above*
Writing Skills (objective) 59 or above
Written Essay 6


*Satisfies TASP requirement. Allows student to register for college level courses in Elementary Statistics, Topics in Mathematics, Modern Math I and Modern Math II, but does not meet performance standards for College Algebra set by Mathematics Task Force.

Alternative test instruments approved by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board will be used by ACC to initially test students. The section(s) of an alternative test that a student passes will count towards meeting TASP requirements, and the sections failed or not attempted will subject a student to TASP requirements and ACC's developmental education plan.

ACC shall develop and use a variety of methods to minimize the number of cases where a person who had mastered basic algebra at an earlier time is placed at an inappropriately low math level due to poor assessment-test performance resulting from lack of recent practice. The existing methods of providing sample review problems and urging study for the TASP or alternative test will be supplemented by additional methods found to be effective and feasible. These may include, for example, the use of short review seminars or test-taking workshops.

ACC recognizes and accepts THECB approved test from transfer students who have taken the assessment test at another institution.

Alternative tests will be used only for initial testing; the TASP test must be used for all retakes. On completion of developmental coursework, the student shall take that portion of the TASP Test for which developmental education was required.

The COMPASS test is the alternative test approved by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board and used by ACC.

Other alternative tests accepted by ACC include the ASSET, Multiple Assessment Programs and Services (MAPS), and ACCUPLACER.

EXCEPTIONS TO TESTING

Untested students can enroll in college-level coursework only if they meet the "exceptional circumstances" specified in 5.314 of Subchapter P in the TASP Policy Manual.

A student who has not been tested may enroll in coursework but must take a test approved for TASP purposes not later than the end of the first semester of enrollment. If any student under this section fails to test during the designated semester, the student will not be permitted to re-enroll or to enroll at Austin Community College in any courses other than non-degree credit courses until he or she has tested.

Exceptional circumstances include, but are not limited to:

Documented illness, injury or other bonafide emergency, which prevents a student from testing.

Diagnosed and documented disability for which reasonable and appropriate accommodations could not be provided by Austin Community College in a timely manner.

Deaf students who arrive on campus without having taken the Stanford Achievement Test prior to enrollment may be allowed to enter school but are required to take the Stanford at the next regularly scheduled offering.

After all reasonable ACC testing opportunities have passed and additional students, through no fault of their own, have not been tested.

EXEMPTIONS PERMITTED BY STATE OF TEXAS STATUE TO TASP REQUIREMENT

The following exemptions and exceptions from TASP requirements described by THECB in TASP Policy Manual, pp. 14-20 will be allowed at Austin Community College:

Acceptable ACT/SAT/TAAS scores

Baccalaureate degrees

Certificate programs of one year or less

Deaf students

Dyslexia and other related disorders

Enrollment on a temporary basis

"Grandfathering"

International students

National Student Exchange program participants

Out-of-state Students

Students 55 years of age or older

 

EXEMPTIONS APPROVED BY AUSTIN COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Students will begin required developmental education courses during their first semester at the College, except when the following circumstances occur.

Students who transfer to ACC from out-of state or private Texas colleges and who have taken and passed courses on ACC's B or Better List with an A or B will not have to take the TASP or TASP Alternative test in any area in which they have satisfied the requirement. This decision will be made on a student-by-student basis.

Students who transfer to ACC from out-of-state or private Texas colleges and who have not taken and passed courses on ACC's B or Better List (THECB approved college-level courses) with an A or a B will have to take the TASP or a TASP alternative, or demonstrate that they are TASP exempt, or enroll on a temporary basis only.

Successful completion of the Developmental Sequence

A student can demonstrate successful completion of the developmental program at any time by passing that section of the TASP test for which previous test results indicated that developmental education was necessary.

A student who successfully completes the developmental sequence, retakes and fails the TASP test may, during the subsequent semester of enrollment:

 

Successful Completion of THECB Approved College Level Courses (B or Better)

Students may fulfill TASP requirements by achieving a grade of "B or better" in a college level course in the area of identified skill deficiency.

The following courses at Austin Community College correspond to the Common Course numbers listed in the THECB TASP Policy Manual and when completed with a "B or better" grade, allow students to fulfill the TASP requirement:

Writing

ENGL 1301 (English Composition I)

ENGL 1302 (English Composition II)

 

Reading

GOVT 2301 (U.S. Government)

GOVT 2302 (Texas State and Local Government)

ENGL 2321 (British Literature I)

ENGL 2322 (British Literature II)

ENGL 2326 (American Literature I)

ENGL 2327 (American Literature II)

ENGL 2331 (World Literature I)

ENGL 2332 (World Literature II)

HIST 1301 (U.S. History I -(Open Campus)
HIST 1302 (U.S. History II- (Open Campus)

PSYCH 2301 (General Psychology)

Mathematics

MATH 1314 (College Algebra)

MATH 1316 (Trigonometry)

MATH 1332 (Topics in Mathematics)

MATH 1333 (Mathematics for Measurement)

 

Monitoring Students' TASP Status

ACC will implement IP (In Progress) grades for students who remain in their developmental classes, make progress, but do not satisfy the course requirements for a C or better. These students must be given the opportunity to transfer to an individualized program of instruction to complete the semester.

PART II. AUSTIN COMMUNITY COLLEGE'S DEVELOPMENTAL EDUCATION PROGRAM

Overview

Austin Community College refers to developmental education students whose TASP or TASP Alternative results indicate that developmental education is necessary to improve their skills in any area tested. The purpose of Developmental Education courses is to provide instruction to help students succeed in college. These courses and programs are available at the same campus at which students would otherwise attend class and include the availability of classes through Distance Learning Centers.

Austin Community College's goal is to move students who need developmental education through the system as quickly as possible, once they master the skills at each level.

Structure and Organization

Austin Community College will ensure the quality and accountability of its developmental education program through the following components of the program's structure and organization:

Students who are deficient in math must successfully complete the approved program by receiving a "C" or better in Elementary Algebra, Intermediate Algebra or Topics in Developmental Math or demonstrate mastery of equivalent competencies. The flow chart on page 11 identifies the prescribed pathways.

Students certified by Austin Community College as having successfully completed the developmental coursework or program prescribed by the College shall retake those portions of the TASP Test for which developmental education was required. The College will encourage students to retake the TASP Test at the first available regular test administration following completion of developmental education, but no later than the end of the next enrolled academic term. Students will be allowed to enroll for the next academic term without being enrolled in developmental education to give the student a chance to retake the TASP Test during that term. Students who fail to retake the test as specified by THECB guidelines will be returned to appropriate developmental activities until the test is retaken.

CHART I. TASP FLOW CHART FOR STUDENTS WHO NEED DEVELOPMENTAL COURSES

CHART II . Pathway for Developmental Math Students

OBJECTIVES AND STRATEGIES

Austin Community College offers a variety of opportunities for students to reach their goal of becoming successful in college-level courses. During a two-year period of curricular review, the faculty in Developmental Communications, Mathematics and Communications identified the following objectives and strategies as being critical to the success of developmental education students:

Objectives

Strategies

Achieving the identified goals is, to a large extent, dependent on the quality of the course, the expertise and competence of the faculty, the accurate assessment and placement of students, and having the necessary instructional resources.

Once these faculty are employed, both full-time and adjunct faculty participate in a comprehensive orientation program. In addition to receiving faculty manuals which contain information needed by all new faculty, these new faculty are also mentored by an experienced faculty member, and must attend professional development activities which are a part of the on-going development for continuing faculty.

Developmental education enrolls some of the neediest of students with the weakest educational backgrounds, and thus requires the greatest amount of experienced faculty support. To adequately plan and integrate developmental education successfully, full-time faculty and staff are needed to provide appropriate instruction and guidance. Full time faculty are better positioned to provide more continuity in curriculum development, student advising, and instruction.

Faculty have been a strong link in the developmental program, however, it was recognized that there was a need to better assess the skills students bring with them when they enter college. Once information is obtained on skill level, a determination can be made about placement in courses appropriate to their skill levels.

Assessment and Placement: Research has shown that mandatory assessment and placement in appropriate courses is fundamental to building a successful foundation for college work. The purpose of assessment at Austin Community College is to determine the level at which students perform in basic skills. The assessment identifies those students who have academic weaknesses, who are unlikely to be able to perform college-level work, and who need remediation to upgrade their basic skills. Mandatory placement then assures that students are appropriately placed in courses that remediate identified skill deficiencies.

Prior to Fall 1999, ACC had only administered a cognitive assessment test. However, research shows that student success in college is also dependent on other personal and attitudinal factors. Following a review of the Developmental Education Program by Dr. Hunter Boylan, a consultant who is nationally recognized as an expert in Developmental Education, and a recommendation from that review that the College integrate both affective and cognitive measures into the assessment and placement process, a committee was appointed to survey a battery of affective assessment instruments. The committee was also charged to recommend an appropriate instrument that would incorporate both affective and cognitive measures, that when administered, would identify personal characteristics and attitudinal factors that had the potential to affect student performance and success.

The instrument selected was the College Student Inventory which assesses learning type on the basis of how the student processes information. Students then register in a Human Development Course designed to assist students in identifying their educational goals, personal strengths, college resources and services, and also explore strategies for academic success such as time management, decision-making and study skills.

PATH FOR STUDENTS WHO NEED DEVELOPMENTAL COURSES

ACC concurs with Robert McCabe, who in a report on developmental education, recommended that an assessment program that is linked to educational prescriptions should be instituted. Assessment must go beyond identifying those who are deficient. It should also provide the basis for learning solutions and building a bridge program to other courses that address skill deficiencies.

Austin Community Colleges assesses, orients and advises students using intake and placement models designed by the College. Once students begin classes, they are advised based on ACC's Advising Model.

Required Orientation - ACC requires new degree-or certificate-seeking college-credit students to complete orientation. In addition to attending an orientation session before the start of classes, students who do not pass two or more TASP subtests or who score at the basic skill level on a TASP subtest must register for Human Development (HDP 1601), Developmental Study Skills (DSSK 0012), or Developmental Study Skills (DSSK 0013) during their first ten hours at ACC. If the College is unable to offer enough HDP 1601, DSSK0012, or DSSK 0013 sections during a specific semester to meet the demand, students are unable to register for HDP 1601, DSSK 0012, or DSSK 0013, then they must register for one of the courses in the next semester. However the intent is for students to take HDP 1601, DSSK 0012, or DSSK 0013 during their first term at ACC.

Required Assessment - ACC has implemented the Texas law that requires students to take the TASP test or a TASP alternative test before attending college credit classes or demonstrate that they are TASP exempt or TASP waived. Students in TASP waived certificate programs must take appropriate ACC placement tests if courses in their educational plan have basic skill prerequisites.

Required Counseling - Students whose assessment scores indicate they need two or more developmental courses must meet with a counselor before they register for their first term in order to develop an educational and a support service plan. These students will continue to meet with a counselor or a faculty advisor with experience working with developmental students until they complete their developmental course work. The student is required to have a counselor's approval of their proposed schedule before registering.

Mandatory Load Limits - Students whose assessment scores indicate that they need two or more developmental courses will not be allowed to take more than 10 hours in a sixteen week term and no more than 6-8 hours in an 8 week or a 5.5 week term. If two required developmental courses are Reading and Writing, the student is limited to 10 hours which must include a developmental course and 6 hours in an 8-week or a 5.5 week term.

Intent Information - ACC collects intent data the first time a college credit student registers each semester. This information assists the College to track student goals; it also reminds students why they are at ACC.

Early Warning Signs - The College implemented a Standards of Academic Progress System in Fiscal Year 2000. The system identifies students with low grade point averages or students who complete less than 50% of the courses for which they register and directs them to appropriate interventions. Students whose GPA and completion rates do not improve after one term must meet with a counselor before registering for additional classes and receive approval of the counselor for any proposed schedule before registering.

Degree Audit System- ACC will complete an automated degree audit system in Fy01 that will allow students to verify their progress toward their educational objectives. This system will help students taking developmental classes to track their academic progress and understand the next step.

Mandatory Advising for New Students - All new students must meet with a counselor or an advisor. In general, counselors work with new students who need two or more developmental courses, transfer students on probation or suspension from another institution, and students who have not selected a major. Advisors work with new students who need only one developmental course, transfer students in good academic standing at their previous institution, and students who have declared a major.

Advising Model for Returning or Currently Enrolled Students - Advisors monitor the progress of and advise students who need only one developmental class, usually mathematics. Faculty advisors who teach developmental courses monitor the progress and advise students who need two or more developmental courses and students who need one developmental course, if the students are referred by a faculty colleague or ACC advisor

SUPPORT FOR STUDENTS ENROLLED IN DEVELOPMENTAL COURSES

Instructional Methods: Teaching methods vary according to the needs of learners. Research shows that adults learn from observing, practicing, and receiving feedback; respond better when material is presented through a variety of teaching methods on different sensory levels; expect conscientious instructors who can present information effectively; and vary greatly in their educational level, life experiences and motivations for achievement.

To meet the goal of reforming the curriculum to support student success in developmental education, the faculty engaged in an eighteen month review of the curriculum with a specific goal of assessing the quality of the instructional program to determine if and how courses could be revised to better meet the needs of students. During this period of review faculty benchmarked best practices and identified models that would improve student retention and success, strengthen the overall educational program, and provide needed student support services.

During the curriculum review and revision process, it was important to select teaching methods consistent with stated learning outcomes, to sequence learning activities to build a solid foundation of reading, writing and mathematics skills, and to structure opportunities to provide for student participation and feedback.

A principle of adult education supports that adult learners have a need for a diversity of instructional methodologies. With this as one of the guiding principles, the developmental education faculty developed courses using a range of formats, delivery modes, and innovative approaches such as workshops, seminars, tutoring, supplemental instruction, learning labs, distance learning, continuing education (test preparation workshops), linked courses, and computer mediated learning.

A number of pilot projects grew out of this review, many of which have been integrated into the curriculum on the basis of their appropriateness and student's level of success, and are identified below.

These options are available through a variety of regular and accelerated schedules to accommodate individual student needs and learning styles. These include but are not limited to:

Table 2 identifies learning strategies which evolved from pilot projects and are now integrated into the developmental education curriculum.

Table 2. Learning Strategies

Instructional Strategy

Objectives

Implementation Date

Target

Success Criteria

Paired Courses

Allows students to complete remediation in a concentrated format using content in one course to reinforce learning in another course.

Current Year 1999 - 2000:

Spring 2000

Summer 2000

Fall 2000

Next Year 2000 - 2001

Students will perform as well as students in the traditional classroom settings using a standardized test as a measure.

Reading - Writing

8 sections

Reading - History

 

 

10 sections

 

Reading - Government

10 sections

Reading - Psychology

 

60% of the students in DEVR 1313 will complete the content area course with a C or better.

Flexible Entry Courses

Reading - 12 week session (Invest/Plato)

Provide students with an alternative method of instruction.

Current Year 1999 - 2000

4 sections

Students in the flexible entry sections will perform as well as students in the traditional classroom setting using the same standardized test as a measure.

Fast Track Courses

Remediation allows most students to complete their reading in one 16-week semester.

At least 60% of the students who enroll in a first 8-weeks course will enroll in the follow-up course during the 2nd 8 weeks session.

Reading Skills I - 8 weeks

 

 

 

 

Reading Skills II - 8 weeks

 

 

 

 

Basic Math Skills - 8 weeks

 

Fall 2000

3 sections

 

Elementary Algebra - 8 weeks

 

5 sections

Intermediate Algebra - 8 weeks

4 sections

Test Preparation Courses

Student acquires test-taking skills.

Current Year 1999 - 2000

80% of the students who take the TASP test after completing remediation and the TASP Math Prep course will pass TASP

MATD 0162

 

Fall 1999

19 sections

.

Spring 2000

20 sections

Summer 2000

13 sections

Fall 2000

16 sections

 

 

 

Instructional Strategy

Objectives

Implementation Date

Target

Success Criteria

Computer Mediated Courses

Provides alternative delivery methods of instruction.

Adult learners who are engaged by use of animation, video, audio and who chose to have more control over their learning and pace of progress.

Students in the mediated sections will have the same completion rate as the lecture sections. Students in the mediated sections will have the same overall grade distribution as the students in the lecture sections. The drop rate for students in the mediated sections will be lower than the drop rate in the lecture sections.

Reading (Plato/Invest)

 

 

 

 

Writing I & II (Academic Systems)

 

Current Year 1999 - 2000

8 sections

 

Math (Academic Systems)

 

Current Year 1999-2000

 

 

Basic Math Skills

 

Spring 1999

4 sections

 

Pre-Algebra

 

Summer 1999

6 sections

 

Elementary Algebra

 

Fall 1999

7 sections

 

Intermediate Algebra

 

Spring 2000

6 sections

 

 

 

Next Year 2000-2001:

 

 

 

 

Fall 2000

19 sections

 

 

 

Spring 2001

15 sections

 

Math (Prentice Hall)

Current Year 1999 -2000:

Basic Math Skills

 

Spring 1999

3 sections

 

Pre-Algebra

 

Fall 1999

6 sections

 

Instructional Strategy

Objectives

Implementation Date

Target

Success Criteria

Elementary Algebra

 

Spring 2000

6 sections

 

Intermediate Algebra

Distance Learning

Allows students to choose an alternative method of instruction

Current Year 1999 - 2000

Students in distance learning classes will have the same completion rate as the lecture sections. Students in distance learning classes will have the same grade point average as the lecture sections.

Personal Computer by Modem

 

Next Year 2000 - 2001:

1 section

 

Vocabulary

 

Fall 2000

1 section

 

Instructional Strategy

Objectives

Implementation Date

Target

Success Criteria

Basic Math Skills

 

Spring 2001

2 sections

 

 

Students will perform as well as students in the traditional classroom settings using the same standardized test as a measure.

Current Year 1999 - 2000:

 

 

Elementary Algebra

 

Fall 1999

1 section

 

Intermediate Algebra

 

Spring 2000

2 sections

 

*Developmental Labs

To give students more time on task to develop skills by practicing reading, writing and math.

Skills learned by students in the lecture setting will be reinforced in the labs. This will allow students' performance to improve.

Reading

 

 

 

 

Writing

 

 

 

 

Math

 

Spring 2000

Added 18 lab sections

The completion rate of students in the courses will be higher than the completion rate under the four course developmental sequence.

WRT

 

Fall 1999

13 sections

 

RDG

 

Fall 1999

26 sections

 

Human Development Courses

To learn study skills and time management; learn to manage stress.

Students who need assistance with learning/study skills:

HDP 1601

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fall 1999

22 sections (360 students)

 

 

 

Fall 2000

32 sections (720+ students)

 

*Projections based on TASP

 

 

 

 

Data will be collected on these Instructional strategies with results used in a continuous feed back loop to improve instruction.

CONTINUOUS QUALITY IMPROVEMENT

Having in place an effective model for evaluating courses, instructional goals and student performance is one of the key steps in improving the curriculum. However, the results of the evaluation must also be used to improve instructional programs and services. This process creates a means of assuring a cycle of quality improvement in the curriculum.

Program Review

The program review process provides an opportunity for assessing the developmental education program's effectiveness in terms of student achievement, student retention, student outcomes, the effectiveness of the curriculum, the appropriateness and effectiveness of instructional resources, and the preparation of faculty. These elements combined with other institutional resources help to determine the quality of the instructional program.

Course Standards

Austin Community College will ensure consistency in its developmental courses by creating college wide objectives, entry and exit criteria, syllabi, and departmental exit exams. Faculty members will evaluate the courses they teach, students will evaluate faculty, and the Office of Institutional Effectiveness will provide information on student success rates and grade distributions by subject area and section. The College will use evaluation results to measure the effectiveness of instructional strategies, identify the types of students who benefit from each approach, identify students that do not benefit from existing instructional approaches, and explore additional ways to help these students to succeed.

Effectiveness Measures

The College will measure outcomes for students who need developmental courses as part of its ongoing institutional effectiveness program. Each fall, the Office of Institutional Effectiveness will submit a report to the Associate Vice-President for Academic Programs, the Deans responsible for developmental education courses, and the Task Force Chairs in whose areas developmental courses are taught. The report will use the assessment criteria and methodologies outlined in Table 1 and allow faculty who teach developmental courses to identify program strengths and weaknesses.

Data generated by this report will provide the foundation for strategic and budget planning activities in all academic areas that offer developmental education opportunities to students.

Table 1: Outcome Measures for Developmental Courses

Purpose: To provide campus-wide programs and services that assist academically under-prepared students so that they will meet their educational goals.

Intended outcome

Assessment Criteria

Methodology

Developmental to Credit Migration Rates

Students who successfully complete Developmental Writing will be successful in the next credit-level English course.

Based on data from the student database, at least 60% of students who complete Writing Skills II with a grade of "C" or better and then take English Composition I within two years, will complete English Composition I with a grade of "C" or better.

Each semester identify cohorts of students who complete Writing Skills II with a grade of "C" or better, starting in Fall 1997. Each semester thereafter, track the cohort enrollment in English Composition I. Calculate the percentage of those who complete English Composition I with a grade of "C" or better within two years of their completion of Writing Skills Il.

Students who successfully complete Developmental Writing will be successful in the next credit-level English course

Based on data from the student database, students who complete Writing Skills II with a grade of "C" or better and then take English Composition I or English Composition II within two years, will have average course grades within +0.3 grade points of the average course grades for all students taking these courses who were not required to take developmental writing.

Each semester identify cohorts of students who complete Writing Skills II with a grade of "C" or better, starting in Fall 1997. Each semester thereafter, track the cohort enrollment in English Composition I and II. Compare the course grades for these students with the course grades for students taking English Composition I and II who did not take Writing Skills II.

Students who successfully complete Developmental Reading will be successful in the next credit-level course.

Based on data from the student database, at least 60% of students who complete Reading Skills II with a grade of "C" or better and then take a course designated to meet TASP guidelines within two years will complete the credit-level course with a grade of "C" or better.

Each semester identify cohorts of students who complete Reading Skills II with a grade of "C" or better starting in Fall 1997. Each semester thereafter, track the cohort enrollment in credit-level courses designated to meet TASP guidelines. Calculate the percentage of those who complete these courses with a grade of "C" or better within two years of their completion of Reading Skills II.

Students who successfully complete Developmental Reading will be successful in the next credit-level course.

Based on data from the student database, average course grades of students who complete Reading Skills II with a grade of "C" or better and then take a course designated to meet TASP guidelines within two years will be within 0.3 grade points of the average course grades for all students taking these courses.

Each semester identify cohorts of students who complete Reading Skills II with a grade of "C" or better, starting in Fall 1997. Each semester thereafter, track the cohort enrollment in courses designated to meet TASP guidelines. Compare the course grades for these students with the course grades for students taking these courses who did not take Reading Skills II.

Students who successfully complete Developmental mathematics will be successful in the next credit-level math course.

Based on data from the student database, at least 60% of students who complete Intermediate Algebra with a grade of "C" or better and then take College Algebra, Trigonometry, or Topics in Mathematics within two years will complete the credit-level course with a grade of "C" or better.

Each semester identify cohorts of students who complete Intermediate Algebra with a grade of "C" or better, starting in Fall 1997. Each semester thereafter, track the cohort enrollment in College Algebra or Trigonometry or Topics in Mathematics. Calculate the percentage of those who complete these courses with a grade of " C" or better within two years of their completion of Intermediate Algebra.

Students who successfully complete Developmental Mathematics will be successful in the next credit-level math course.

Based on data from the student database, average course grades of students who complete Intermediate Algebra with a grade of "C" or better and then take College Algebra, Trigonometry, or Topics in Mathematics within two yeas will be within 0.3 grade points of the average course grades for all students taking there courses.

Each semester identify cohorts of students who complete Intermediate Algebra with a grade of "C" or better, starting in Fall 1997. Each semester thereafter, track the cohort enrollment in College Algebra, Trigonometry, or Topics in Mathematics. Compare the course grades for these students with the course grades for students taking these courses who did not take Intermediate Algebra.

Fall to Spring Retention Rates

First-Time in College (FTIC) degree seeking students enrolled at ACC in the fall semester who are required to take developmental courses will return the following Spring semester (Fall-to-Spring Retention)

Based on data provided by the. THECB, the percentage of (FTIC) degree-seeking students enrolled in developmental education courses in the fall semester who return the following spring semester will not be significantly different from the percentage of students who were not enrolled in developmental education courses who returned in the Spring.

Using THECB Annual Data Profile report, compare the reenrollment rates of students taking developmental courses with the rate of those who are not.

First-Time in College (FTIC) degree seeking students enrolled at ACC in the fall semester who are required to take developmental courses will return the following spring semester (Fall-to-Spring Retention).

Based on data provided by the THECB, the percentage of FTIC degree-seeking students enrolled in developmental education courses in the fall semester who return the following spring semester will not be significantly different from the state average for students enrolled in developmental education courses.

Using THECB Annual Data Profile report, compare ACC and statewide average Fall-to-Spring retention rates.

There will be no significant differences by demographic group between Fall-to Spring retention rates for FTIC degree or certificate-seeking students enrolled in developmental education courses and those not enrolled in developmental education courses.

Based on data from the THECB Annual Data Profile, for each demographic group, the Fall-to-Spring return rate for FTIC students enrolled in developmental education courses will be within 5% of the Fall-to-Spring return rate for students NOT enrolled in developmental education courses.

Using data from THECB Annual Data Profile report, compare developmental and non-developmental students' average Fall-to-Spring retention rates by demographic group.

Students who are required to be enrolled in Developmental Education Courses at ACC will complete state-mandated requirements.

Based on data provided by the THECB annually, the percentage of ACC students enrolled in developmental education courses who complete state-mandated requirements will be at or above the completion rates for those students statewide.

Using THECB data for LBB measures, compare ACC and statewide percentages.

Students who are required to enroll in developmental course will complete their developmental requirements.

Based on collected data, course completion rates will be determined for the following groups of students required to enroll in developmental courses: those required to take developmental courses in one area, those required to take developmental courses in two areas, and those required to take developmental courses in three areas.

Using data from the student database, compare original proficiency levels to last proficiency levels for each area by "group" (developmental courses required in one, two or three areas).

There will be no significant differences between developmental program completion rates by demographic group.

Based on data from the student database, the differences in developmental requirements completion rates among demographic groups will be within 5%.

Using data from the student database, compare original proficiency levels to last proficiency levels for each area by "group" (developmental courses required in one, two or three areas) and by ethnicity.

Course Completion Rates

Students who are required to be placed in developmental courses will complete their courses at rates similar to those taking credit courses.

Based on data from the student database, course completion rates (the percentage of students earning a grade of "C' or better) for developmental courses will be within 5% of course completion rates for credit courses.

Using internally generated reports, compare the average course completion rate for developmental courses with that of credit courses.

In addition to the outcomes report generated by the Office of Institutional Effectiveness, faculty who teach developmental courses and the administrators who work with them will also analyze the following data each fall:

USING EVALUATION RESULTS AND OUTCOME MEASURES TO IMPROVE PROGRAMS AND SERVICES

Conclusion

ACC recognizes that having a solid foundation in reading, writing and mathematics is essential to success in college level course work, and that many students who enroll in college are not prepared to succeed at this level. The College is committed to eliminating barriers in the educational process therefore, it's Developmental Education Plan is reflective of this commitment.

One of the major goals of the developmental education program is to assist students to move through remediation as quickly as possible with the skills necessary for success in college level course work. This plan's activities and strategies are directed at accomplishing this goal.

The plan recognizes that there is no one instructional approach that meets the needs of all students -that students have different learning styles, educational goals, timelines, resources, and support systems and thus the plan reflects a broad based, comprehensive approach in assisting students to meet their educational needs.

The plan provides both structure and flexibility. It provides the structure necessary to accomplish assessment and placement; it makes connections and linkages to institutional support services, while also having the flexibility that students need to select the mode of instruction, scheduling options or instructional strategies that meet their particular needs.

The developmental education plan is a living document in that the plan and its effectiveness will be reviewed on an annual basis with curricular changes being made accordingly.