David M. Lauderback, Ph.D.
Professor of History

STUDY GUIDE
U.S. HISTORY II — ONLine

 

QUIZZES


NOTE:  Students must use a lap top or desk top computer to take the quizzes and exams via Blackboard. You will not be able to take the quizzes and exams via a phone, iPad, or tablet.  So be sure you have access to the internet and a computer -- not a tablet or an iPad or a phone -- to take the quizzes and exams.  The ACC Testing Centers are currently not available, so you will have to take the exams remotely.  And to take quizzes and exams via Blackboard you must use a lap top or desk top computer with live access to the internet.

Learning objectives and directions for the Exams can be found below.  Quiz directions start at the top of the Study Guide.

Testing Policy
Testing Policy

Chapter Quizzes

Students must take all fourteen (14) Chapter Quizzes to complete the course.

NOTE: You WILL RECEIVE AN F IN THE COURSE if you miss any quizzes or exams. So be sure to take all of the chapter quizzes no later than the deadline for Exam 5 listed in the Course Schedule. No quizzes, exams, or re-tests will be accepted after the deadline for Exam 5 listed in the Course Schedule.

Each chapter has a twenty-five (25) question multiple-choice quiz that focuses on the learning objectives found in the Study Guide. Please see the Study Guide for the steps to follow when reading the chapters in Give Me Liberty! and the links on the course Blackboard page to use in order to prepare for the Chapter Quizzes.

Combined, the total average of the Chapter Quizzes equals the value of one Unit Exam toward your final grade.

Students will take 14 Chapter Quizzes, one for each chapter in Foner, Give Me Liberty! An American History, vol. 2, Seagull Edition. Each Chapter Quiz is available via the course Blackboard page. Just click on:

To receive full credit, students must submit the Chapter Quizzes by 11:59 pm on the date the Chapter Quiz is due in the Course Schedule. If the quiz is submitted after 11:59 pm on the date the Chapter Quiz is due in the Course Schedule, it will be treated as a "late." The highest score you can receive on a late quiz is 18/25 (72%). 

NOTE:  The first quiz attempt will be graded and will count toward the Total Quiz Average. Students may take the quizzes more than once for practice.  But, only the first attempt will be graded.

The deadline for all late quizzes is the deadline for the 5th Exam. If you do not complete any quiz by the deadline for the 5th Exam, you will receive a 0 for each missing quiz. No quizzes will be accepted after the deadline for Exam 5 listed in the Course Schedule.

Students must:

REMEMBER:  The first quiz attempt will be graded and will count toward the Total Quiz Average. Students may take the quizzes more than once for practice.  But, only the first attempt will be graded.

Students may:

AND: The first quiz attempt will be graded and will count toward the Total Quiz Average. Students may take the quizzes more than once for practice.  But, only the first attempt will be graded.

REMINDER: You WILL RECEIVE AN F IN THE COURSE if you miss any quizzes. So be sure to take all of the chapter quizzes no later than the deadline for Exam 5 listed in the Course Schedule. No quizzes, exams, or re-tests will be accepted after the deadline for Exam 5 listed in the Course Schedule.

REMEMBER:  I am always happy to meet before and after quizzes and exams to talk about test-taking strategies and how to apply the study guide to the quizzes and exams. Come on by or give me a call during my office hours. Or send me an email. If my office hours do not fit your schedule, let me know and we will set up a time.:)

Tutoring

Check out the new Help! page from ACC Distance Learning for a range of services, including information about classes, testing, tutoring, Advising, and How Tos on using Blackboard. The ACC Learning Labs provide provide one-on-one and group tutoring as well as guided study groups in a variety of subject areas for your ACC classes. The ACC Learning Labs have offices located at the Cypress Creek, Eastview, Northridge, Pinnacle, Rio Grande, Riverside, Round Rock, and South Austin Campuses with hours morning, noon, and night plus weekends to help you get where you're going. Please see our hours of operation for more information.

ACC also provide 15 hours of free online tutoring services per semester for distance learning students who cannot come to campus to meet with a tutor in person. The service is called SMARTHINKING and provides academic support and independent study resources 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. In addition to live, one-on-one help with a number of subjects, SMARTHINKING also offers an Online Writing Lab to assist students with writing essays and papers in many disciplines. Click here to contact the Learning Lab for a Username and Password to and login instructions.

Preparing for the Chapter Quizzes

Follow the steps in the Study Guide and you ought to do well on the exams.

Below are a series of steps designed to help you prepare for the Chapter Quizzes and the Unit Exams. Each of the items below are available via the course Blackboard page.  Just click on:

When you open the Chapter page, you will see the links you can access including the Chapter Quiz.

Please note, only the Chapter Quizzes and the Unit Exams will count toward your semester grade.  The other steps are set up to help you prepare, first, for the chapter quizzes.  Then, you can  use the Chapter Quizzes to practice for the the Unit Exams.

I am always happy to meet before and after quizzes and exams to talk about test-taking strategies and how to apply the study guide to the quizzes and exams. Come on by or give me a call during my office hours. Or send me an email. If my office hours do not fit your schedule, let me know and we will set up a time.:)

Step 1:  Focus Questions

Each chapter begins with a list of Focus Questions. You can find the Focus Questions at the beginning of every chapter of the textbook. At the bottom of the Study Guide below, you will find the Focus Questions for each chapter and the pages covered by each Focus Question.

Please note that each Focus Question also has some additional, or supplemental, questions listed right below with the page numbers for each supplemental question.

Remember, each Focus Question covers specific pages in each chapter and, each Focus Question has supplemental questions that each cover specific pages.

So take time when taking notes the Focus Questions.

The Focus Questions have several several important factors, influences, steps, results, or developments (whichever the Focus Question requires).  As you take notes from the textbook, direct your review of the material to find details to help explain the answers to the questions.  You ought to find four or five factors for each Focus Question and each additional supplemental question.  None of the Focus Questions or the supplemental questions below each Focus Question can be answered with one word answers. As you find the four or five pertinent factors for each Focus Question and each additional question. Write out your answers.  Then, study your notes. Use the other links in the course Materials to help you review the details for the Focus and Supplemental Questions.

If you simply skim the text looking for one word answers to the Focus Questions, you WILL have difficulty with the quizzes and exams.  Put the time into studying and reviewing your notes regularly, and you should be pleased with your test results.

The Focus Questions and the additional supplemental questions are designed to give you the structure to help guide your understanding of the purpose and details of each chapter.  Every link in the Course Materials -- the Outline, the Guided Reading Exercises, the Author Videos, the Sources of Freedom & the Voices of Freedom, the US History Tour, the iMap, and all the rest -- are created to help you make sense of the details in the text book. The Focus Questions exist to help you understand not only the details of the people and events of American history, but also why the people who live in United States have acted as they have.

Most important, all of the links on the Course Materials for every chapter have been set up to help answer the Focus Questions. 

Why? 

Because the questions on the Chapter Quizzes and the questions in the Unit Exams come from the Focus Questions and the additional questions listed below each Focus Question.

See below for a copy of the Focus Questions by Unit and Chapter


Step 2:  Outline

Before you even begin to read a chapter, spend some time with the Outline. Familiarize yourself with some of the important terms and people. Get a sense of the order in which events took place. See how the author has organized the main information and the subsets for each part of the chapter.

It is okay if you do not understand or are able to memorize each of the details of the Outline the first time if you review the Outline link. Instead, think of the Outline as a way to organize your thoughts about the chapter. Use the Outline to make sense of the main points of each chapter. Then, when you do the Guided Reading Exercises, spend time with the Sources of Freedom and Visions of Freedom links, take the US History Tour, do some of the exercises on iMap, and work with any of the other links in each chapter, return to the Outline to help remind you of the main points of each chapter. Take advantage of the Outline to review, once again, the details you need to answer the Focus Questions.

Then, when you have completed taking notes for the Focus and supplemental questions in a chapter, use the Outline to review your notes. See how well you covered the material and how your notes combined with the outline help you to understand the purpose and details of the chapter.

The Outline is not a required element of the course. The Outline is not graded.

The Outline is an excellent tool to use when reviewing the material in each chapter and will help you prepare for the Chapter Quizzes and Unit Exams.

Step 3:  Author Videos

Each chapter has a series of Author Videos.  Eric Foner, the author of Give Me Liberty! uses the videos to explore some important events and details for each Focus Questions.  Watching them is a good way to review the main themes of the chapter and think about the Focus Questions.

The Author Videos are not a required element of the course. The Author Videos are not graded.

The Author Videos are an excellent tool to use when reviewing the material in each chapter and will help you prepare for the Chapter Quizzes and Unit Exams.

Step 4:  Flashcards for Key Terms

Each chapter has a link to a series of "flashcards" that you can use to review the Key Terms from the chapter. You can find the Key Terms at the end of each chapter. The Key Terms have the corresponding page numbers right after the term in the list in your chapter. Also, each of the Key Terms in the glossary at the end of the textbook.You can download and/or print out the flash cards to study at your convenience.

The Flashcards are not a required element of the course. The Flashcards are not graded.

The Flashcards are an excellent way to review some of the details of the material in each Chapter and will help you prepare for the Chapter Quizzes and Unit Exams.

Step 5:  Sources of Freedom & Visions of Freedom

Each chapter has series of documents and images that explore differing conceptions of "freedom."  Spending time with the Sources of Freedom and the Visions of Freedom will help you think about the ways in which the people who have lived in the Untied States conceive of freedom. And, each of the documents and images are linked directly to the Focus Questions at the beginning of the chapter.

The Sources of Freedom and Visions of Freedom are not a required element of the course. The worksheets attached to the Sources of freedom and Visions of Freedom are not graded. 

The Sources of Freedom and Visions of Freedom are excellent tools to use when reviewing the material in each chapter and will help you prepare for the Chapter Quizzes and Unit Exams.

Step 6:  US History Tour & IMAP

The US history to provides a series of interactive links that's racist Oracle developments across time, touching down on locations vital to our nation's heritage and development. Points of interest in each tour launch primary and multimedia sources you can view through Google Chrome.

Each chapter also has a series of interactive maps, or IMAP.  The interactive maps are great way to take a look at the movement of people and ideas overtime. You can really see the evolution of the economy, agriculture, and movement of people over time.

The US History Tour and IMAP are not a required element of the course. The US History Tour and IMAP are not graded.

The US History Tour and IMAP are excellent tools to use when reviewing the material in each chapter and will help you prepare for the Chapter Quizzes and Unit Exams.

Step 7:  Review Questions

At the end of each chapter, you can find a list of Review Questions and Key Terms. The author has written the review questions to help you make sense of the details you just read. Most of all, the review questions help you make sense of the Focus Questions and the additional questions within the Guided Reading Exercises. The Key Terms help you to understand which events, themes, issues, and people, matter most in the chapter. See the Flashcards for how to review the key terms. 

The Review Questions are not a required element of the course. The Review Questions are not graded.

The Review Questions are an excellent tool to use when reviewing the material in each chapter and preparing for the Chapter Quizzes and Unit Exams.

Step 8: InQuizitive

Each chapter has an online module designed to help students review the material before taking the Chapter Quiz: InQuizitive.

You can find the link to on InQuizitive on the Textbook link on the course Blackboard page.

The InQuizitive modules are not a required element of the course. The InQuizitive modules are not graded.

The InQuizitive modules are an excellent tool to use when reviewing the material in each chapter and preparing for the Chapter Quizzes and Unit Exams.

Step 9:  Chapter Quiz

When you are ready to take the Chapter Quiz, just go to the course Blackboard page, click on Course Materials, and then click on the link to the Chapter Quiz.

Once you begin the quiz, you need to complete in one sitting. You will have twenty (20) minutes to complete the quiz.  If you submit without answering all the questions, then you will receive zero (0) points for any unanswered questions.  Once you submit, the quiz is done. There are no retests for the Chapter Quizzes.

Remember, to receive full credit, students must submit the Chapter Review Quizzes by 11:59 pm on the date the quiz is due in the Course Schedule. If the quiz is submitted after 11:59 pm on the date the Chapter Quiz is due in the Course Schedule, it will be treated as "late." The highest score you can receive on a late quiz is 18/25 (72%). 

NOTE:  The first quiz attempt will be graded and will count toward the Total Quiz Average. Students may take the quizzes more than once for practice.  But, only the first attempt will be graded.

The deadline for all late quizzes is the deadline for the 5th Exam. If you do not complete any quiz by the deadline for the 5th Exam, you will receive a 0 for each missing quiz. No quizzes will be accepted after the deadline for Exam 5 listed in the Course Schedule.

And remember:

The Focus Questions are designed to help you make sense of all of the details in the text book by giving you the chance to read the chapters in a structured way so that you can explain the key points of each chapter.

The Focus Questions have several several important factors, influences, steps, results, or developments (whichever the Focus Question requires). Rely on the Focus Questions to direct your review of the assigned chapters.  You ought to find four or five factors,  for each Focus Question and each additional sub-question. 


Be prepared to explain the who, what, when, where, how, and why of each question below. None of the Focus Questions or the supplemental questions can be answered with one-word answers. As you find the four or five pertinent factors for each Focus Question and each additional question, write out your answers. As you are taking notes ask yourself, "do I have all of the details I need to explain: who did what, when, where, how and why."


Then, study your notes. Everyday. Review the notes everyday. The key to doing well in a Distance Education course is to review every day, several times a day, even if only for a few minutes at a time.  Review, review, review.:)  And as you review keep asking, "can I explain the who, what, when, where, how, and why." Use the other links in Course Materials for each chapter to help you review and practice the Focus Questions.


Follow the steps in the Study Guide and you ought to do well on the exams.


If you simply skim the text looking for one word answers to the Focus Questions, you WILL have difficulty with the quizzes and exams.  Put the time into studying and reviewing your notes regularly, and you should be pleased with your test results.


Most important, I am always happy to meet before and after quizzes and exams to talk about reparation and test-taking strategies, on how to apply the study guide to the quizzes and exams. Come on by or give me a call during my office hours. Or send me an email. If my office hours do not fit your schedule, let me know and we will set up a time.:)

Remember, as you go through the textbook to answer each of the Focus Questions below, think of how you can explain each of the questions below. Once again, look for the details that will enable you to link the who, what, when where, how, and -- most important why.

gREEN
                        dIV

EXAMS
Unit Exams

Students must take five (5) Unit Exams to complete the course. 

REMINDER: You WILL RECEIVE AN F IN THE COURSE if you miss any chapter quizzes or exams. So be sure to take all of the exams no later than the deadline for Exam 5 listed in the Course Schedule. No quizzes, exams, or re-tests will be accepted after the deadline for Exam 5 listed in the Course Schedule.

Each unit has a twenty-five (25) question multiple-choice exam that draws from the Focus Questions in the chapters you have read for the unit. 

Two things to remember about the Unit Exams:

1.)  The Unit Exams are more difficult than the Chapter Quizzes.

How so?

The Chapter Quizzes require you to apply what you have learned from one chapter.  The Unit Exams require you to apply what you have learned from three (3) or four (4) chapters. See the Course Schedule for which chapters are covered in which units.

2.) Your total course average determines your final grade. In that sense, you may fail one or more exams and still pass the course provided that your average of the fourteen chapter quizzes and all 5 Exam scores is 70% or better. In order to receive the maximum score on an exam, students must take exams no later than the deadline listed in the Course Schedule. If you take the exam after the deadline, then it counts as a re-test. See the re-test policy below.

Students must:

Students may:

Please see for the complete list of ACC College Policies for the official statement on Use of the Testing Center. ACC TESTING CENTERS ARE CURRENTLY CLOSED

https://www.austincc.edu/offices/academic-outcomes-assessment/master-syllabi/college-policies
Re-testing

If you do not pass any or all of the five exams the first time you take the exam, then you may retest each exam once (and only once).  There are two restrictions on the retest:

REMINDER: You WILL RECEIVE AN F IN THE COURSE if you miss any exams. So be sure to take all of the exams no later than the deadline for Exam 5 listed in the Course Schedule. No quizzes, exams, or re-tests will be accepted after the deadline for Exam 5 listed in the Course Schedule.

Respondus Lock Down Browser    ACC TESTING CENTERS ARE CURRENTLY CLOSED

Students will take their exams electronically on ACC Blackboard via the Respondus Lock Down Browser. You can use any of the computers in any ACC Testing Center to take your exams. Log in to your ACC Blackboard account, go to the course page, and click on “Exams.”

After you complete your exam or retest, the Testing Center will give you a "feedback" form.  KEEP THIS FORM!!!  The feedback form is your ONLY proof that you completed the test at the appropriate time.  DO NOT THROW AWAY ANY FEEDBACK FORM UNTIL YOU HAVE RECEIVED YOUR FINAL GRADE AT THE END OF THE SEMESTER!!!!

WARNING:  If you use the RGC Testing Center for this online course, please be sure to mark the Testing Center Student Request Form for "online."  Otherwise, you may receive my classroom test that is all essay.

To view your exams scores log in to your ACC Blackboard account, go to the course page, and click on Tools, and then My Grades. You can review your progress in the class via the Grade Center and also check your status on the orientation form and the B and A level projects.

And remember:

The Focus Questions are designed to help you make sense of all of the details in the text book by giving you the chance to read the chapters in a structured way so that you can explain the key points of each chapter.

The Focus Questions have several several important factors, influences, steps, results, or developments (whichever the Focus Question requires). Rely on the Focus Questions to direct your review of the assigned chapters.  You ought to find four or five factors, etc. for each Focus Question and each additional sub-question. 


Be prepared to explain the who, what, when, where, how, and why of each question below. None of the Focus Questions or the additional questions can be answered with one-word answers. As you find the four or five pertinent factors for each Focus Question and each additional question, WRITE OUT your answers. When you are taking notes ask yourself, "do I have all of the details I need to explain: who did what, when, where, how and why."


Then, study your notes. Everyday. Review the notes everyday. The key to doing well in a Distance Education course is to review every day, several times a day, even if only for a few minutes at a time.  Review, review, review.:)  And as you review keep asking, "can I explain the who, what, when, where, how, and why." Use the other links in the course Materials to help you review and practice the Focus Questions.


Follow the steps in the Study Guide and you ought to do well on the exams.


If you simply skim the text looking for one word answers to the Focus Questions, you WILL have difficulty with the quizzes and exams.  Put the time into studying and reviewing your notes regularly, and you should be pleased with your test results.


Most important, I am always happy to meet before and after quizzes and exams to talk about reparation and test-taking strategies, on how to apply the study guide to the quizzes and exams. Come on by or give me a call during my office hours. Or send me an email. If my office hours do not fit your schedule, let me know and we will set up a time.:)

Remember, as you go through the textbook to answer each of the Focus Questions below, think of how you can explain each of the questions below. Once again, look for the details that will enable you to link the who, what, when where, how, and -- most important why.

gREEN
                          dIV


NOTE:  Learning objectives and directions for the Exams can be found below.  Quiz directions start at the top of the Study Guide.

Exam 1: 
The Map Test


Because life in the of the United States has been, and continues to be, shaped and influenced to a large degree by the geography of the continent, it is imperative that students know the basic details of United States geography. Therefore the student will be required to take a geography map test.

The multiple-choice map test will be taken using the Respondus lock-down Browser on one of the computers in one of the the ACC Testing Centers. All of the exams are available at every ACC Testing Center. So you can begin taking exams right away. See the ACC Testing Centers for their locations and hours   ACC TESTING CENTERS ARE CURRENTLY CLOSED

The map test will be the first exam taken in this course and must be completed by the deadline date listed in the Course Schedule.

An atlas map containing all of the features the student will need to identify can be found in the textbook. Please see the practice map below which may be copied for study. Here is a link to a series of maps you can use to review the location of rivers, lakes, cities, states, and the rest.  

Cities and States

https://legacy.lib.utexas.edu/maps/united_states/us_general_reference_map-2003.pdf

Rivers and Lakes

https://legacy.lib.utexas.edu/maps/united_states/us-rivers_and_lakes-2003.pdf

The test will specify thirty (25) of the following and ask the student to locate them on a map:

 

All 50 states by name Great Basin
Canada Great Plains
Mexico Chesapeake Bay
Atlantic Ocean Florida Keys
Pacific Ocean Long Island
Gulf of Mexico Cape Cod
Hudson River 49 s North Latitude
Ohio River Washington D.C.
Mississippi River New York City
Missouri River Philadelphia
Red River Boston
Columbia River Charleston, S.C.
Colorado River Chicago
Rio Grande River Austin, Texas
All 5 Great Lakes by name Richmond
Sierra Nevada Mountains Denver
Rocky Mountains






Map

 

****************************************************************************************************************

NOTICE:
!!TESTS 2-5 REQUIRE MUCH MORE PREPARATION THAN TEST 1!!
!!TESTS 2-5 ARE MUCH MORE DIFFICULT THAN TEST 1!!
YOU MUST PAY ATTENTION TO THE QUESTIONS ON THE TESTS
AND CAREFULLY APPLY
WHAT YOU HAVE LEARNED FROM
THE STUDY GUIDE BELOW

REMEMBER, WE CAN MEET BEFORE AND AFTER YOUR EXAMS TO TALK ABOUT TEST TAKING STRATEGIES AND HOW TO APPLY THE STUDY GUIDE TO THE EXAMS.

JUST ASK.:)


*************************************************************************************

Exam 2: “Progress” 1865-1915


The Focus Questions are designed to help you make sense of all of the details in the text book by giving you the chance to read the chapters in a structured way so that you can explain the key points of each chapter.

The Focus Questions have several several important factors, influences, steps, results, or developments (whichever the Focus Question requires). Rely on the Focus Questions to direct your review of the assigned chapters.  You ought to find four or five factors, etc. for each Focus Question and each additional sub-question. 


Be prepared to explain the who, what, when, where, how, and why of each question below. None of the Focus Questions or the additional questions can be answered with one-word answers. As you find the four or five pertinent factors for each Focus Question and each additional question, WRITE OUT your answers. When you are taking notes ask yourself, "do I have all of the details I need to explain: who did what, when, where, how and why."


Then, study your notes. Everyday. Review the notes everyday. The key to doing well in a Distance Education course is to review every day, several times a day, even if only for a few minutes at a time.  Review, review, review.:)  And as you review keep asking, "can I explain the who, what, when, where, how, and why." Use the other links in the course Materials to help you review and practice the Focus Questions.


Follow the steps in the Study Guide and you ought to do well on the exams.


If you simply skim the text looking for one word answers to the Focus Questions, you WILL have difficulty with the quizzes and exams.  Put the time into studying and reviewing your notes regularly, and you should be pleased with your test results.


Most important, I am always happy to meet before and after quizzes and exams to talk about reparation and test-taking strategies, on how to apply the study guide to the quizzes and exams. Come on by or give me a call during my office hours. Or send me an email. If my office hours do not fit your schedule, let me know and we will set up a time.:)

Remember, as you go through the textbook to answer each of the Focus Questions below, think of how you can explain each of the questions below. Once again, look for the details that will enable you to link the who, what, when where, how, and -- most important why.

 

Ch. 15  “What is Freedom?  Reconstruction”

 

Focus Question 1.  What divisions of freedom did former slaves and slaveholders pursue in the postwar South? pp. 566–79

 

Discuss the role of the Freedmen’s Bureau in the postwar South. pp. 571-573

How did former slaveholders define their freedom and that of their slaves? pp. 569-71

What did freedom mean to African-Americans in the South after the Civil War? pp. 566-9

 

Focus Question  2.  What were the sources, goals, and competing visions for Reconstruction?  pp. 579-90

 

Discuss Radical Reconstruction as a Constitutional Revolution. pp. 583-6

How did Radical Republicans gain control of the Reconstruction process? pp. 581-3

What was Andrew Johnson’s vision for Reconstruction? pp. 579-81

 

Focus Question 3.  What were the social and political effects of Radical Reconstruction in the South? pp. 590-4

 

Discuss Southern blacks' struggle for economic freedom. pp. 594.

Discuss the accomplishments of Southern Reconstruction governments. pp. 593-4

 

Focus Question 4.  What were the main factors, in both the North and South, for the abandonment of Reconstruction? pp. 594-601

 

How did Southern whites challenge Reconstruction governments? pp. 594-6 & 598-9.

Why did Northerners lose their resolve to pursue Reconstruction? pp. 597-601



 

Ch. 16 “America’s Gilded Age, 1870-1890

 

Focus Question 1.  What factors combined to make the United States a mature industrial society after the Civil War? pp. 605-613

 

Discuss the significance of technological innovation for the second industrial revolution. pp. 605-608

Explain the transformation and concentration of American big business in the late nineteenth century. pp. 608-610

 

Focus Question 2.  How was the West transformed economically and socially in this period? pp. 613-629

 

Discuss the hopes and challenges of ranchers in the American West. pp. 616-618 Discuss the different approaches of the federal government toward the Plains Indians. pp. 621-27

 

Focus Question 3.  Was the Gilded Age political system effective in meeting its goals? pp. 629-634

 

How did corruption shape politics in the Gilded Age? pp. 630

Why did the federal government produce so little change in the Gilded Age? pp. 631-34

 

Focus Question 4.  How did the economic development of the Gilded Age affect American freedom? pp. 634-639

 

How did Americans make sense of the new social structure of the Gilded Age? pp. 635-636

How did the notion of the freedom of contract create opportunities and constraints on liberty? pp. 636-639

 

Focus Question 5How did reformers of the period approach the problems of an industrial society? pp. 639-647

 

What were the goals of the Knights of Labor, and what set them apart from other unions? pp. 640-41

Discuss the national phenomenon of Edward Bellamy's Utopia. pp. 643

 

 

Ch. 17  “Freedom’s Boundaries, at Home and Abroad, 1890-1900”

 

Focus Question 1What were the origins and the significance of Populism? pp. 651-659

 

Discuss the role of government in the capital-labor conflicts of the 1890s. pp. 649-652

Identify the Populist Coalition and discuss its strengths and weaknesses. pp. 654-658

 

Focus Question 2How did the liberties of blacks after 1877 give way to legal segregation across the South? pp. 659-669

 

Discuss the hopes and disappointments African-Americans experienced. pp. 660-665

Discuss Southern lynchings in the late nineteenth century. pp. 666-668

 

Focus Question 3.  In what ways did the boundaries of American freedom grow narrower in this period? pp. 669-677

 

Discuss anti-immigrant sentiments in the United States in the late nineteenth century. pp. 669-672

How did Booker T. Washington try to address white supremacy in the South? pp. 672-673

 

Focus Question 4How did the United States emerge as an imperial power in the 1890s?  pp. 677-689

 

Discuss the reasons why Americans were drawn to expansion in the late nineteenth century pp. 677-681

What broader philosophical questions did the American experience with imperial acquisition raise in the United States? pp. 684-689

 


 

Ch. 18  “The Progressive Era, 1900-1916”

 

Focus Question 1  Why was the city such a central element in Progressive America? pp. 694-703

 

Discuss the ways in which international migration streams connected the United States with the world. pp.

How did Henry Ford transform lives of American workers and of consumers? pp.

 

Focus Question 2  How did the labor and women’s movements challenge the nineteenth-century meanings of American Freedom? pp 703-715

 

How did the prospects for industrial freedom change for workers in the Progressive era? pp.

What were the origins and goals of the "new feminism"? pp.

 

Focus Question 3.  In what ways did Progressivism include both democratic and anti-democratic impulses? pp. 715-724

 

Discuss the impact of Progressive reform on the reach of democracy. pp.

What role did state and local governments play in bringing about reform during the Progressive era? pp.

 

Focus Question 4.  How did the Progressive presidents foster the rise of the nation-state? pp. 724-732

 

What set Theodore Roosevelt’s approach to economic regulation apart from his predecessors? pp.

What was Woodrow Wilson’s "New Freedom" and how did it compare to Roosevelt’s "New Nationalism"? pp.



*************************************************************************************

 Exam 3:  “War & Promise” 1916-1945


The Focus Questions are designed to help you make sense of all of the details in the text book by giving you the chance to read the chapters in a structured way so that you can explain the key points of each chapter.


The Focus Questions have several several important factors, influences, steps, results, or developments (whichever the Focus Question requires). Rely on the Focus Questions to direct your review of the assigned chapters.  You ought to find four or five factors, etc. for each Focus Question and each additional sub-question. 


Be prepared to explain the who, what, when, where, how, and why of each question below. None of the Focus Questions or the additional questions can be answered with one-word answers. As you find the four or five pertinent factors for each Focus Question and each additional question, WRITE OUT your answers. When you are taking notes ask yourself, "do I have all of the details I need to explain: who did what, when, where, how and why."


Then, study your notes. Everyday. Review the notes everyday. The key to doing well in a Distance Education course is to review every day, several times a day, even if only for a few minutes at a time.  Review, review, review.:)  And as you review keep asking, "can I explain the who, what, when, where, how, and why." Use the other links in the course Materials to help you review and practice the Focus Questions.


Follow the steps in the Study Guide and you ought to do well on the exams.


If you simply skim the text looking for one word answers to the Focus Questions, you WILL have difficulty with the quizzes and exams.  Put the time into studying and reviewing your notes regularly, and you should be pleased with your test results.


Most important, I am always happy to meet before and after quizzes and exams to talk about reparation and test-taking strategies, on how to apply the study guide to the quizzes and exams. Come on by or give me a call during my office hours. Or send me an email. If my office hours do not fit your schedule, let me know and we will set up a time.:)

Remember, as you go through the textbook to answer each of the Focus Questions below, think of how you can explain each of the questions below. Once again, look for the details that will enable you to link the who, what, when where, how, and -- most important why.

 

Ch. 19  “Safe for Democracy: The United States and World War I, 1916-1920”

 

Focus Question 1.  In what ways did the Progressive presidents promote the expansion of American power overseas? pp. 737-742

 

Explain the significance of the Panama Canal for American expansion. pp. 737-739

Discuss the reasons and the outcome of American intervention in Mexico. pp. 739-742

 

Focus Question 2.  How did the United States get involved in World War I?  pp. 742-746

 

How did Americans react to the outbreak of World War I in Europe? pp. 742-744

Explain Woodrow Wilson’s vision for peace after World War I. pp. 744-746

 

Focus Question 3.  How did the United States mobilize resources and public opinion for the war effort? pp. 746-755

 

How did the federal government direct the economy in World War I? pp. 746-747
How did civil liberties fare during World War I? pp. 752-755

 

Focus Question 4.  How did the war affect race relations in the United States? pp. 755-767

 

How did World War I change American attitudes toward immigration? pp. 759-761

Discuss the new opportunities Southern African-Americans found in World War I. pp. 765-767

 

Focus Question 5.  Why was 1919 such a watershed year for the United States and the world? pp. 767-777

 

Explain the surge of anticommunist hysteria in the United States after World War I. pp. 768-771

What signs of future major conflicts were already becoming apparent at the end of World War I? pp. 776-777

 

 

 

Ch. 20  “From Business Culture to Great Depression. The Twenties, 1920-1932”

 

Focus Question 1.  Who benefited and who suffered in the new consumer society of the 1920s? pp. 784-89

 

Who benefited the most from the new prosperity of the 1920s? pp. 782-783

Who fell behind and lost ground in the economy of the 1920s? pp. 784-87

 

Focus Question 2.  In what ways did the government promote business interests in the 1920s? pp. 789-795

 

How did the Republican administrations shape economic life at home during this decade? pp. 790-791

Discuss the role of the United States in the world during the 1920s. pp. 794-795

 

Focus Question 3.  Why did the protection of civil liberties gain importance in the 1920s? pp. 795-799

 

What caused the new push for civil liberties in 1920s America? pp. 796-798

How did the nation’s courts address the question of civil liberties after World War I? pp. 798-799

 

Focus Question 4.  What were the major flash points between fundamentalism and pluralism in the 1920s? pp. 799-809

 

What role did race play in the fundamentalist orientation of conservative Americans in the 1920s? pp. 795-806

Discuss the growth and cultural importance of Harlem in the 1920s. pp. 807-809

 

Focus Question 5.  What were the causes of the Great Depression, and how effective were the government’s responses by 1932? pp. 810-816

 

Discuss the way regular Americans experienced the Great Depression. pp. 812-814

How did Herbert Hoover address the economic crisis? pp. 814-815

 

 

 

Ch. 21  “The New Deal, 1932-1940”

 

Focus Question 1.  What were the major policy initiatives of the New Deal in the Hundred Days? pp. 821-830

 

How did the Roosevelt administration try to salvage the national banking system?  pp. 823-824

How did the New Deal initially try to aid farmers? pp. 826-828

 

Focus Question 2.  Who were the main proponents of economic justice in the 1930s, and what measures did they advocate? pp. 830-835

 

Why did workers join the new labor organization, the Congress of Industrial Organizations? pp. 831-833

How did leading voices on the left criticize the limitations of the New Deal? pp. 833-836

 

Focus Question 3.  What were the major initiatives of the Second New Deal, and how did they differ from the First New Deal? pp. 835-838

 

Discuss the ways the Works Progress Administration changed the nation.  pp. 836-837

How did the Roosevelt administration design Social Security? pp. 837-838

 

Focus Question 4.  How did the New Deal recast the meaning of American freedom? pp. 838-845

 

How did Franklin D. Roosevelt change the meaning of liberalism during his presidency? pp. 839-840

How did Franklin D. Roosevelt try to overcome the opposition of the United States Supreme Court? pp. 841-844

 

Focus Question 5.  How did New Deal benefits apply to women and minorities? pp. 845-851

 

What role did Southern Democrats play in limiting the reach of the New Deal? pp. 846-847

How did the New Deal affect the lives of Native Americans? pp. 848

 

Focus Question 6.  How did the Popular Front influence American culture in the 1930s? pp. 852-859

 

What vision of American society did the Popular Front promote in the 1930s? pp. 854

How did organized labor and labor militancy in the United States change the role of civil liberties during the 1930s? pp. 855-857

 

 

 

Ch. 22  “Fighting for the Four Freedoms. World War II, 1941-1945”

 

Focus Question 1.  What steps led to American participation in World War II? pp. 864-873

 

Discuss the American position of isolationism in the 1930s. pp. 866

Explain the U.S. strategy in the European theater of war. pp. 867

 

Focus Question 2.  How did the United States mobilize economic resources and promote popular support for the war effort? Pp. 873-880

 

What impact did World War II have on American businesses? pp. 874-875

How did women's lives change during World War II? pp. 879-880

 

Focus Question 3.  What visions of America’s postwar role began to emerge during the war? Pp. 880-884

 

Explain the concept of the American Century. pp. 880-881

How did Congress handle the question of economic rights for citizens? pp. 882-884

 

Focus Question 4.  How did American minorities face threats to their freedom at home and abroad during World War II? pp. 884-898

 

Discuss the experience of Mexican-Americans during World War II pp. 886-887

Why did World War II spur the growth of the civil rights movement? pp. 893-898

 

Focus Question 5.  How did the end of the war begin to shape the postwar world? pp. 898-903

 

Explain why the United States developed and deployed the atomic bomb during World War II. pp. 898-900

How did the United States reshape the world economic order toward the end of World War II? pp. 900-903



*************************************************************************************

Exam 4: The American Way of Life” 1945-1968


The Focus Questions are designed to help you make sense of all of the details in the text book by giving you the chance to read the chapters in a structured way so that you can explain the key points of each chapter.

The Focus Questions have several several important factors, influences, steps, results, or developments (whichever the Focus Question requires). Rely on the Focus Questions to direct your review of the assigned chapters.  You ought to find four or five factors, etc. for each Focus Question and each additional sub-question. 


Be prepared to explain the who, what, when, where, how, and why of each question below. None of the Focus Questions or the additional questions can be answered with one-word answers. As you find the four or five pertinent factors for each Focus Question and each additional question, WRITE OUT your answers. When you are taking notes ask yourself, "do I have all of the details I need to explain: who did what, when, where, how and why."


Then, study your notes. Everyday. Review the notes everyday. The key to doing well in a Distance Education course is to review every day, several times a day, even if only for a few minutes at a time.  Review, review, review.:)  And as you review keep asking, "can I explain the who, what, when, where, how, and why." Use the other links in the course Materials to help you review and practice the Focus Questions.


Follow the steps in the Study Guide and you ought to do well on the exams.


If you simply skim the text looking for one word answers to the Focus Questions, you WILL have difficulty with the quizzes and exams.  Put the time into studying and reviewing your notes regularly, and you should be pleased with your test results.


Most important, I am always happy to meet before and after quizzes and exams to talk about reparation and test-taking strategies, on how to apply the study guide to the quizzes and exams. Come on by or give me a call during my office hours. Or send me an email. If my office hours do not fit your schedule, let me know and we will set up a time.:)

Remember, as you go through the textbook to answer each of the Focus Questions below, think of how you can explain each of the questions below. Once again, look for the details that will enable you to link the who, what, when where, how, and -- most important why.


Ch. 23  “The United States and the Cold War, 1945-1953”

 

Focus Question 1. What series of events and ideological conflicts prompted the Cold War? pp. 908-917

 

Explain the emergency of the Truman Doctrine. pp. 909-910

Discuss the causes and consequences of the Berlin Blockade. pp. 912-913

How did the Korean War end up in a stalemate in 1951? pp. 914-916

 

Focus Question 2. How did the Cold War reshape ideas of American freedom? 917-922

 

How did the Cold War affect American culture? pp. 918-919

Why did the concept of human rights emerge during the Cold War? pp. 920-922

 

Focus Question 3. What were the major initiatives of Truman’s domestic policies? pp. 922-927

 

What were President Truman’s domestic policy goals? pp. 922

How did the Democratic Party’s embrace of civil rights shape the election of 1948? pp. 925

 

Focus Question 4. What effects did the anticommunism of the Cold War have on American politics and culture? pp. 927-938

 

Discuss the rise and fall of Senator Joseph McCarthy. pp. 928-931

How did the Cold War shape the struggle for civil rights? pp. 934 & 938

 


 

Ch. 24  “An Affluent Society, 1953-1960”

 

Focus Question 1. What were the main characteristics of the affluent society of the 1950s? pp. 942-957

 

Discuss the changes that television brought to Americans’ lives. pp. 946-947

How did women experience postwar affluence? pp. 949-950

How did the growth of the suburbs “harden” racial divisions the United States in the 1950s? pp. 950-953

 

Focus Question 2. How were the 1950s a period of consensus in both domestic policies and foreign affairs? pp. 957-968

 

What distinguished President Eisenhower’s "Modern Republicanism" from his party’s policies in the past? pp. 959-960

Explain President Eisenhower’s Cold War strategy of massive retaliation. pp. 961

How did the Cold War shape the emergence of a Third World? pp. 962-965

 

Focus Question 3. What were the major thrusts of the civil rights movement in this period? pp. 968-979

 

How did the Brown decision affect the setting out of which the American civil rights movement grew in the 1950s? pp. 972-974

How did southern whites respond to the civil rights movement? pp. 971

How did the Montgomery Bus Boycott become such a significant event? pp. 974-976

 

Focus Question 4. What was the significance of the presidential election of 1960? pp. 979-981

 

Discuss the political differences between John F. Kennedy and Richard Nixon in the 1960 election. pp. 979-980

What did Dwight D. Eisenhower mean with the "military-industrial complex" in his farewell address in 1961? pp. 980

 

 

 

Ch. 25  “The Sixties”

 

Focus Question 1. What were the major events in the civil rights movement of the early 1960s? pp. 985-989

 

How did the participation of college students change the civil rights movement in the early 1960s? 985-6

What made the spring of 1963 the “high point” of civil rights protests, and how did southern whites respond? pp. 986-988

What was the significance of the March on Washington? pp. 988-989

 

Focus Question 2. What were the major crises and policy initiatives of the Kennedy presidency? pp. 989-992

 

How did President Kennedy change America’s role in the world? pp. 989-990

How did the Kennedy administration face and resolve the Cuban missile crisis? pp. 990-991

 

Focus Question 3. What were the purposes and strategies of Johnson’s Great Society programs? pp. 992-999

 

How did the Freedom Summer seek to redress a weakness of Civil Rights Act of 1964? 992-993

Explain the conservative movement that emerged in the 1960s. pp. 994-995

Why did Lyndon B. Johnson push for a War on Poverty in his Great Society program? pp. 997-998

 

Focus Question 4. How did the civil rights movement change in the mid-1960s? pp. 999-1002

 

What were the deeper causes for the uprisings and the black ghettos of American cities in the 1960s? pp. 1000-1001

Explain the rise of Black Power in the 1960s. pp. 1001-1002

 

Focus Question 5. How did the Vietnam War transform American politics and culture? pp. 1002-1014

 

What was "new" about the New Left? pp. 1002-1003

How did Lyndon B. Johnson make the Vietnam War his own? pp. 1005-1008

Why did the anti-War movement and the counterculture seek to create new meanings of freedom? pp. 1008-1009, 1012-1013

 

Focus Question 6. What were the sources and significance of the rights revolution of the late 1960s? pp. 1014-1024

 

How did the Women’s movement expand the drive for greater personal freedom regardless of sexual orientation? pp. 1014-1018

How did the environmental movement become part of the rights revolution of the 1960s and 1970s? pp. 1020-1021

How did the rights revolution of the 1960s bring about the birth of a new constitutional right to privacy? pp. 1021-1023

 

Focus Question 7. In what ways was 1968 a climactic year for the Sixties? pp. 1024-1028

 

What made the year 1968 so pivotal in American history? pp. 1024-1025

Discuss the ways in which 1968 was a global rather than just a national climax of rights revolutions. pp. 1025-1026

 


*************************************************************************************


Exam 5: “A New Century” 1968-present


The Focus Questions are designed to help you make sense of all of the details in the text book by giving you the chance to read the chapters in a structured way so that you can explain the key points of each chapter.

The Focus Questions have several several important factors, influences, steps, results, or developments (whichever the Focus Question requires). Rely on the Focus Questions to direct your review of the assigned chapters.  You ought to find four or five factors, etc. for each Focus Question and each additional sub-question. 


Be prepared to explain the who, what, when, where, how, and why of each question below. None of the Focus Questions or the additional questions can be answered with one-word answers. As you find the four or five pertinent factors for each Focus Question and each additional question, WRITE OUT your answers. When you are taking notes ask yourself, "do I have all of the details I need to explain: who did what, when, where, how and why."


Then, study your notes. Everyday. Review the notes everyday. The key to doing well in a Distance Education course is to review every day, several times a day, even if only for a few minutes at a time.  Review, review, review.:)  And as you review keep asking, "can I explain the who, what, when, where, how, and why." Use the other links in the course Materials to help you review and practice the Focus Questions.


Follow the steps in the Study Guide and you ought to do well on the exams.


If you simply skim the text looking for one word answers to the Focus Questions, you WILL have difficulty with the quizzes and exams.  Put the time into studying and reviewing your notes regularly, and you should be pleased with your test results.


Most important, I am always happy to meet before and after quizzes and exams to talk about reparation and test-taking strategies, on how to apply the study guide to the quizzes and exams. Come on by or give me a call during my office hours. Or send me an email. If my office hours do not fit your schedule, let me know and we will set up a time.:)

Remember, as you go through the textbook to answer each of the Focus Questions below, think of how you can explain each of the questions below. Once again, look for the details that will enable you to link the who, what, when where, how, and -- most important why.


Ch. 26  “The Triumph of Conservatism”

 

Focus Question 1. What were the major policies of the Nixon administration on social and economic issues? pp. 1031-1038

 

What was President Richard Nixon’s position on race issues? pp. 1033-1034

How did the Burger Court address the lingering questions of racial inequality? pp. 1034-1036

How did Richard Nixon change the nation’s Cold War strategy? pp. 1037-1038

 

Focus Question 2. How did Vietnam and the Watergate scandal affect popular trust in the government? pp. 1039-1043

 

What were the strengths and weaknesses of Richard Nixon's policy of Vietnamization? pp. 1039-1041

Why did Richard Nixon resign the presidency in 1974? pp. 1041-1043

 

Focus Question 3. In what ways did the opportunities of most Americans diminish in the 1970s? pp. 1043-1052

 

How did the U.S. economy end up suffering both from inflation and high unemployment? pp. 1043-1044

How did President Jimmy Carter change the nation’s foreign policy? pp. 1049-1050

 

Focus Question 4. What were the roots of the rise of conservatism in the 1970s? pp. 1052-1058

 

Why did the Religious Right attack Equal Rights for women and abortion ? pp. 1053-1055

How did the tax revolt of the latter 1970s gain momentum especially in the West? pp. 1056-1057

 

Focus Question 5. How did the Reagan presidency affect Americans both at home and abroad? pp. 1058-1069

 

How was Reaganomics supposed to work, and what did it look like in practice? pp. 1059-1063

How did President Ronald Reagan’s renewal of the Cold War lead to corruption over Central America? pp. 1065-1067

 


 

Ch. 27  “From Triumph to Tragedy, 1989-2001”

 

Focus Question1. What were the major international initiatives of the Clinton administration in the aftermath of the Cold War? pp. 1073-1080

 

How did the United States get into the first Gulf War in 1991? pp. 1073-1074

Why did Clinton embrace welfare reform as part of his “political strategy?” pp. 1078

How did the world respond to the humanitarian crisis in the Balkans in the 1990s? pp. 1078-1080

 

Focus Question 2. What forces drove the economic resurgence of the 1990s? pp. 1080-1086

 

How did computers revolutionize the nation and its economy? pp. 1082-1083

How did the “Enron Syndrome” reflect deregulation practices? 1084-1085

Why did American workers lose so many manufacturing jobs in the 1990s and thereafter? pp. 1085-1086

 

Focus Question 3. What cultural conflicts emerged in the 1990s? pp. 1086-1102

 

How did immigration change the United States at the turn of the 21st century? 1087-1094

How did the United States end up with the phenomenon of mass incarceration? pp. 1095-1097

How did the “rights revolution” merge with the “identity debate to battle “cultural conservatism? pp. 1098-1100

 

Focus Question 4. How did a divisive political partisanship affect the election of 2000? pp. 1102-1106

 

Why did Republicans try to impeach President Bill Clinton? pp. 1102-1103

How did the nation resolve the dispute over the outcome of the presidential election of 2000? pp. 1103-1105

 


 

Ch. 28  “A New Century and New Crises”

 

Focus Question 1. What were the major policy elements of the war on terror in the wake of September 11, 2001? pp. 1110-1113

 

How did the nation, the American people, and the Bush administration respond to the terror attacks of September 11, 2001? pp. 1110-1112

Explain the Bush Doctrine and its implications. pp. 1112-1113

 

Focus Question 2.  How did the war in Iraq unfold in the wake of 9/11? pp. 1113-1117

 

Why did the United States go to war in Iraq? pp. 1114-1116

What criticisms emerged over the American conduct of war in Iraq? pp. 1116-1117

 

Focus Question 3. How did the war on terror affect the economy and American liberties? pp. 1117-1120

 

How did September 11 change the way the president exercised his constitutional powers? pp. 1118-1119

Explain the controversy over the American use of torture in the war on terror. pp. 1119-1120

 

Focus Question 4. What events eroded support for President Bush’s policies during his second term? pp. 1120-1131

 

What was the larger historical significance of Hurricane Katrina? pp. 1121-1123

How did Bush use fear to drive is policy toward the border and islam?

Explain the causes of the Great Recession. pp. 1129-1133

 

Focus Question 5. What kinds of change did voters hope for when they elected Barack Obama? pp. 1136-1141

 

What change did President Obama manage to bring about, and what were the limits to this change? pp.

What hopes did the election of President Barack Obama inspire in the American people? pp.

  

Focus Question 6. What were the major challenges of Obama’s first term? pp. 1141-1150

 

How did the America respond to growing racial tensions over police shootings?

How did Obama change American foreign policy to meet the challenge of ISIS?

 

Focus Question 7. What were the prevailing ideas of American freedom at the beginning of the 21st century? pp. 1150-1154

 

Why does “American Exceptionalism” also have a “darker side?” pp. 1151-1152

       How does the poem by Langston Hughes reveal the inconsistencies of American Freedom

© David Marcus Lauderback, 2023 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED