Drop or Withdraw From a Class

Know the consequences before you drop or withdraw

If you want to drop or withdraw from a class after it has started, you must complete certain steps. Unless you take these steps, you will remain enrolled in the class even if you do not attend.

See withdrawal instructions.

IMPORTANT: If you stop attending a class but do not officially drop or withdraw, you will receive an F grade in the course.

Timing of drop/withdrawals

Refer to Important Dates & Deadlines for census dates and other deadlines that apply to your class.

When You Drop or Withdraw From a Class
If you drop/withdrawConsiderations
During registration
  • Class is deleted from your enrollment.
  • You are eligible for a full tuition refund.
BEFORE the census date
  • Class is deleted from your enrollment.
  • The class does not earn any grade, and does not appear on your transcript.
  • You may be eligible for a partial tuition refund.
AFTER the census date
  • The class appears on your transcript with a grade of ‘W’ for withdraw.
  • Must occur before the withdrawal deadline for the term.

Consequences of drop/withdrawals

Dropping or withdrawing from a class can affect your financial aid, academic standing, or cost of attendance. Read the information below before you drop a class. Your instructor or an advisor also can help you understand possible consequences of withdrawing and explore alternatives.

Financial aid

You may need to repay your financial aid or lose your eligibility altogether if you withdraw, drop out, get expelled, or reduce your courseload.

Academic standing

Withdrawing from a class after the census date may impact your academic standing. Note additional standards apply to financial aid recipients.

Developmental education

If you are required to take a developmental education class, but you drop the course, your course selections for future semesters may be restricted.

International students

If you're an F-1 visa student, reducing your courseload may result in losing your legal F-1 status.

Undergraduate 6-drop limit

By state law, undergraduates at Texas colleges and universities are limited to six course drops over their academic career. For many students, courses dropped after the census date are included in this drop limit.

Repeating a course: third course attempt

In some cases, you will be charged an additional fee if you later register for a class you previously attempted two or more times.